A gripping LaLiga title race should be all Real Madrid need to pick themselves up from their Champions League semi-final loss to Chelsea, according to Zinedine Zidane.

Madrid head coach Zidane conceded his team were beaten by the better side after goals from Timo Werner and Mason Mount gave Chelsea a 2-0 win at Stamford Bridge, sending them through 3-1 on aggregate to an all-English final against Manchester City at the end of this month.

Los Blancos looked a shadow of the side that won three consecutive European crowns under Zidane between 2016-2018, but the France great insisted he was proud of his players' endeavours on Wednesday.

Now they face up to a LaLiga battle, where they are level on points with Barcelona and two points behind leaders Atletico Madrid with four games remaining. Barca and Atleti face one another this weekend.

"We have spoken on this many times this season. It has been a year with many injuries, ups and downs, and that’s what we have dealt this year," Zidane told a post-match news conference midweek.

"Despite it all, we have done good things in this Champions League in order to reach this stage.

"I think we deserved it and we were only one step from the final, but we have to congratulate this team [Chelsea], who has been better tonight.

"It doesn't change anything. I am very pleased and very proud and now it is the time to rest and be focused on the last four games in LaLiga."

Captain Sergio Ramos and Ferland Mendy were passed fit to start for Madrid and struggled to find top gear, although Zidane insisted he had no regrets over the selections.

"If my players have played it's because they were ready for the 90 minutes," he said.

"Ramos and Mendy were ready to play, that's why I put them on. It was a semi-final and they were ready."

Another man recently back to fitness, Eden Hazard, lasted 89 minutes but had minimal impact against his former club.

After the match, images of Hazard congratulating his old Chelsea team-mates played very badly in Madrid, but Zidane urged patience with the €100million forward.

"Eden needs to play regularly and get his confidence back," he added. "And you get that slowly and playing games.

"So, we need to get back Eden and it will be possible playing games."

Thomas Tuchel said the sacrifice of leaving his family to take on the challenge of managing Chelsea has been "worth it every single day" after making history by guiding them to the Champions League final.

The Blues progressed to the final for the third time in their history as a 2-0 win over Real Madrid clinched a 3-1 aggregate victory and a place in the Istanbul showpiece against Premier League rivals Manchester City on May 29.

In doing so, Tuchel became the first manager in the history of the Champions League and European Cup to reach the final in consecutive seasons with different teams. Tuchel led Paris Saint-Germain to the final last year, only to lose 1-0 to Bayern Munich.

Chelsea will also contest the FA Cup final against Leicester City on May 15 and hold a three-point lead over fifth-placed West Ham in the race for the Premier League top four.

Tuchel has lost only two of his 24 games (W16, D6) since taking charge in January and insists he immediately felt right at home at Stamford Bridge.

"It was worth it every single day so far," Tuchel said of the sacrifice he made.

"I was part of an amazing club from the first day, I felt huge support from day one. I'm very grateful to be at the sideline of this team."

Chelsea took a 1-0 lead through Timo Werner's simple 28th-minute header after Kai Havertz had struck the crossbar, but spurned several chances to stretch their lead as Havertz twice went close and Mason Mount and N'Golo Kante wasted opportunities.

But Mount made the tie safe five minutes from time, becoming the second youngest Englishman to score in the semi-finals of the Champions League – aged 22 years and 15 days – after Wayne Rooney (21 years 182 days).

"The heads were never down, the heads were always up even after these big chances," added Tuchel.

"We always stayed positive and we never regret something so it was fantastic. The job is not done yet, we are in two finals now, the sacrifice I personally gave was worth it since day one."

Chelsea beat Pep Guardiola's City in the FA Cup semi-finals and will face them again in the league on Saturday.

Tuchel rejected the notion of that victory giving Chelsea the upper hand ahead of the final but said of the Wembley win: "It gives us a good feeling, it gives us confidence.

"We played that semi-final on the edge and we used it. I said before and I will say it always for me Bayern Munich throughout the last season with Manchester City, they are the benchmark.

"We wanted to close the gap in this one match, the semi-final, which we did on a very impressive performance and we will need the same level of performance again.

"It gave us belief, it gave us self-confidence for every game after that because it is the highest level you can face. We have these huge challenges in the Premier League, we have come out of it very, very strong, we showed mentality and quality in all of these matches.

"We will arrive with self-confidence and with the positive energy in Istanbul. We will arrive in Istanbul to win, not to be one of the participants, we arrive to be focused to win." 

Mason Mount was delighted to fire Chelsea into the Champions League final against Manchester City but felt Real Madrid got off lightly with a 2-0 defeat at Stamford Bridge.

Timo Werner headed Thomas Tuchel's Chelsea into a first-half lead in London but the tie remained in the balance until Mount made it 3-1 on aggregate five minutes from time on Wednesday.

Chelsea were far superior and passed up a host of chances to make the game safe – Opta's expected goals xG projection tallying 3.8-0.5 in Chelsea's favour.

"We should've probably had about five," Mount beamed in his post-match interview with BT Sport. "But the most important thing is we won. We want to go into every game winning it.

"It was 1-0 but that really didn't matter because if they score, they were back in the game.

"To get that one late on, you can see by the celebrations, it was a massive goal for us and gave us breathing space in the last five minutes.

"We gave everything and we had that desire to win first half. We had a couple of opportunities where we won the ball and should've scored but we got the one late on and it's great.

Werner nodded in a simple finish after Kai Havertz's 28th-minute chip looped down off the crossbar – a first Champions League goal from open play in Chelsea colours for the Germany forward, who came in for criticism for spurning a glorious chance during last week's first leg.

"I said to Timo, 'It must've felt like an eternity for the ball to drop down'," Mount said. "We're all buzzing for him."

City can seal the Premier League title in what is now a dress rehearsal meeting with Chelsea on Saturday.

Pep Guardiola's City have already lifted the EFL Cup for a fourth consecutive season, although Chelsea's 1-0 win over a much-changed XI in last month's FA Cup semi-final will give them hope they can deny the Premier League leaders an elusive first success in Europe's top competition.

"We haven't won anything yet. We've got two massive cup finals and hopefully we can win," Mount added, with Leicester City up at Wembley in the FA Cup final 10 days from now.

"We've got [Manchester City] on Saturday. We've played three times already this season, so it will be a stunning game."

Zinedine Zidane "got everything wrong" in Real Madrid's Champions League loss to Chelsea and could pay the price, Predrag Mijatovic has warned.

Madrid were beaten 2-0 by Chelsea in the second leg on Wednesday as Timo Werner and Mason Mount secured a 3-1 aggregate win in the semi-final.

It could have been a far more convincing scoreline had the Blues been more clinical at Stamford Bridge, while Madrid, who had 68 per cent of the ball, had only one shot on target after the 36th minute.

With Sergio Ramos back but the likes of Raphael Varane, Dani Carvajal and Lucas Vazquez injured, Zidane opted for a 3-4-3 system in which his players rarely looked comfortable.

Edouard Mendy made two good saves from Karim Benzema in the first half but the Chelsea goalkeeper was largely a spectator as he kept an eighth clean sheet in the competition this season, a record for a goalkeeper at an English club.

Madrid could still end the season by defending their league title – they trail leaders Atletico Madrid by just two points with four games left – but former Madrid striker Mijatovic fears the loss to Chelsea may inflict lasting damage.

"Chelsea were really superior in everything: intensity, rhythm, creating chances. We like Zidane and he's done many things, but he got everything wrong," he told Cadena Ser.

"This tie will do a lot of damage to Zidane. So did the previous year, although the league covered some things. Zidane has got a lot of things wrong and that resulted in Madrid's elimination.

"When they started the game and you saw they didn't want to change the picture, with poor Vinicius playing in a position that isn't his, Madrid did practically nothing.

"The team went out totally confused, without knowing what to do. We'll see what happens in LaLiga. The feelings you get from Madrid offer little to think the season will end well."

Former Madrid goalkeeper Santiago Canizares praised Mendy for his decisive saves from Benzema, which ensured Chelsea took a 1-0 lead into half-time.

"Chelsea are not just physical. They have really good tactics and a great attacking and defensive balance. They're a very tough nut to crack," he said.

"We didn't see phases of superiority from Madrid. The two chances Madrid had where from Benzema, but Mendy won the game."

Zidane guided Madrid to three consecutive Champions League triumphs from 2016 to 2018, but they lost at the last-16 stage in the previous two seasons before succumbing to Chelsea this time.

Midfielder Casemiro, who feels Madrid have been left with little in the tank after a challenging year with injuries, felt their defeat proved just what a remarkable run it was to win the tournament three years running.

"We were better in the first 25 minutes, we had two chances with Karim," he said. "Then they played better, they had more chances, but there's no turning back now, we have to think about LaLiga.

"I think Chelsea were superior and played better than us. After the year we've had with injuries, absences, COVID, without fans... we've tried. But they were better. We can't be sad now, we have to think about Sevilla [on Saturday].

"We showed that what we did was historic. It's not easy to win the Champions League. We showed again that it's not easy to win this."

This past year or so has done very little for our basic grasp of time.

Don't leave the house for a week, miss a couple of Zoom quizzes and what even are days?

Time and how easily or readily it passes depends on individual perception – our stresses, worries and hopes at that given moment.

Between Chelsea forward Kai Havertz hitting the Real Madrid crossbar in Wednesday's Champions league semi-final and the ball plopping down onto Timo Werner's head, a little under two seconds passed.

It's nothing really, but how they must have dragged for Werner. So many things to flash through his mind's eye. All soundtracked by a klaxon of "OH GOD, OH GOD, YOU CAN'T MISS… DON'T MISS! ARRRGGHHH!"

He might have thought of how coolly he linked with the effervescent N'Golo Kante in the build-up to Havertz's impudent dinked effort.

Kante negotiated Madrid's seasoned midfield with nimble precision and was one of Chelsea's many outstanding players on the night.

Casemiro and Toni Kroos will not want to think of the France international for some time after this, but the number seven on his blue shirt scampering around and away from them might be a hard image to shift.

Werner would create a glorious chance for Kante as only ex-Chelsea goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois prevented Madrid from collapsing in a heap after half-time. He has brought much more than unfortunate penalty box uncertainty to Chelsea, however much howling missed chances like his volley in the first leg linger in the collective consciousness.

The ex-RB Leipzig man has 12 goals and 10 assists this season, making him the first Chelsea player to record double figures for both since Eden Hazard in 2018-19.

"I'm sure I've seen him around here somewhere," Werner might have thought as he gazed up into the cool night sky.

Zinedine Zidane's selection of Hazard in his starting XI and decision to keep him on for 89 minutes had little logic beyond "it's a funny old game". The only thing coming back to haunt anyone right now is the Belgium playmaker's price tag and what Florentino Perez thinks is acceptable when faced with a chasm in the Madrid accounts.

Few players in full flight are as utterly joyous as Hazard, but that was the Chelsea Hazard. Fitness woes have turned his dream move into a nightmare. He failed to register a shot or create a chance for a team-mate during the first half on his old stomping ground.

There was a snapshot on the angle to test imperious Chelsea goalkeeper Edouard Mendy in the 64th minute before Hazard returned to the margins.

Big-name signings have no guarantees, as Werner might have mulled as he positioned his forehead for the ball and a virtually unmissable chance. Oh, to be a striker in form.

That can be a different kind of burden, though.

“For people who like to watch football, Karim is a gift,” Zidane recently said of his talismanic striker Karim Benzema. "We enjoy him and so do his teammates. Karim makes the difference."

As much as it must be nice to have his team-mates enjoy him, Benzema must sometimes wish they'd join in. His lightning control and volley conjured an equaliser out of nothing at Valdebebas last week.

He almost did likewise at Stamford Bridge, producing a brilliant first touch and venomous shot from the edge of the box that Mendy saved superbly.

When Benzema escaped the attentions of Antoinio Rudiger and Thiago Silva before half-time to send a looping header towards the net, the Chelsea goalkeeper was again his equal. The same could not be said for anyone with whom he shares a dressing room.

Mason Mount was on hand to make sure of a 2-0 win and an all-English final against Manchester City five minutes from time. A lavishly gifted youngster putting Madrid out of their misery felt somewhat symbolic - Mount possessed of the verve and energy that this shell of the great side that won three consecutive Champions Leagues have long since left behind. Time waits for no one.

Just like their limp exits against Ajax and City in the past two seasons, this was meek. The only dazzle that remains comes from their famous white kits.

Back in the 28th minute, there was the dazzling white of the floodlights, the crossbar and the ball all in Werner's immediate view. It was time, his time – the easiest goal he will ever score and very possibly the most important.

Two seconds from the moment Havertz hit the crossbar. Eight days on from Werner's torment in Madrid. A whole, torrid season. However you frame it, it was worth the wait.

Chelsea reached the Champions League final after a 2-0 win over Real Madrid on Wednesday completed a 3-1 aggregate victory in the semi-final.

Thomas Tuchel's side will meet Manchester City in Istanbul after a fully deserved triumph at Stamford Bridge, secured through Timo Werner and Mason Mount.

The Germany international's first open-play goal in the competition since September 2019 put the Blues ahead before Mount converted from close range in the closing stages after the hosts had missed a plethora of second-half openings as they countered Madrid with ease.

Zinedine Zidane's men looked out of sorts in a makeshift 3-4-3, even with captain Sergio Ramos and former Chelsea star Eden Hazard back in the side, as their winless record against the Premier League club stretched to five matches.

Following a quiet start, Werner had the ball in the net after 18 minutes but the forward had strayed offside before meeting Ben Chilwell's low cross.

Madrid enjoyed 73 per cent of the possession in the first 25 minutes and Edouard Mendy made a brilliant one-handed save to keep out a shot from Karim Benzema on the turn.

Yet they went behind two minutes later. N'Golo Kante's superb turn of pace allowed him to set up Kai Havertz, and although his chip came off the crossbar, Werner was on hand to nod in the rebound.

Benzema was denied again by Mendy, this time from a close-range header, but Madrid struggled to create opportunities despite their dominance of the ball.

Havertz again struck the woodwork with a powerful header just after the restart, but this time Thibaut Courtois breathed a sigh of relief as the ball bounced over and behind.

Mount wasted a glorious chance, driving at Courtois but blasting his finish over, and Havertz was denied by the goalkeeper's leg when through following a simple ball over the top.

Kante also wasted a good opening before Mount at last killed the contest, steering into the net from Christian Pulisic's cut-back after Madrid lost possession in their own half.

What does it mean? Chelsea to battle City second all-English final in three seasons

Madrid had never beaten Chelsea in four previous European meetings coming into this match and had not won in four consecutive away games against English sides in the competition.

It seemed the omens had weighed on the visitors as they failed to create anything meaningful beyond the first-half openings for Benzema, with the players looking uncomfortable in Zidane's system.

Chelsea, by contrast, were diligent and energetic and fully deserved to reach a third Champions League final.

No messing from Mendy

Mendy made four saves as Chelsea faced four shots on target in the first half of a Champions League game for the first time since October 2017 against Roma.

His two from Benzema were exceptional and helped to put his side in a commanding position at the break – one they did not relinquish.

Zidane loses Midas touch

Zidane guided Madrid to three consecutive trophies in this competition and oversaw an impressive defeat of Liverpool in the previous round.

However, his back-three set-up here, somewhat enforced by injury problems, was vulnerable to Chelsea's breaks throughout and seemed to stifle Hazard, Benzema and Vinicius Junior.

What's next?

Chelsea face something of a warm-up act for the final when they meet Pep Guardiola's City in the Premier League on Saturday. Madrid's LaLiga title battle resumes against fellow contenders Sevilla.

Eden Hazard and Sergio Ramos were named in the Real Madrid starting line-up to face Chelsea in the Champions League semi-final second leg.

Belgium star Hazard was only involved as a second-half substitute during the 1-1 draw with his former club in the first leg in Spain.

The 30-year-old has only started nine games in all competitions in a season impacted by a succession of injuries and a positive test for coronavirus.

Madrid captain Ramos, who has not played since sustaining a calf injury during the March international break, was chosen to partner Eder Militao at the heart of defence as the injured Raphael Varane missed out. Ferland Mendy returned at left-back, with Nacho Fernandez on the right of the defence.

Hazard was joined in attack by Karim Benzema, who scored Madrid's equaliser in the first leg, and Vinicius Junior in front of the traditional midfield trio of Luka Modric, Toni Kroos and Casemiro.

Chelsea chose Timo Werner and Kai Havertz in attack, supported by Mason Mount, as head coach Thomas Tuchel selected an apparent 3-4-3 system.

Christian Pulisic had to be content with a place on the bench despite opening the scoring in the tie.

Madrid have not beaten Chelsea in four previous European matches.

Real Madrid midfielder Toni Kroos expects head coach Zinedine Zidane to remain at the helm beyond this season.

After winning LaLiga last season, Madrid are firmly in contention for more silverware this term although nothing is guaranteed at this stage.

Madrid are two points behind leaders and neighbours Atletico Madrid with four games remaining in LaLiga, while Los Blancos are competing in Champions League semi-finals.

Speaking ahead of Madrid's Champions League semi-final second leg away to Chelsea, after the opening fixture finished 1-1, Kroos was asked about Zidane.

"I think he'll be our coach next season," Kroos said with a laugh during his news conference. "He has a contract."

Kroos was bullish about Madrid's chances against Chelsea at Stamford Bridge, despite not getting the favourable result in the first leg.

"We are strong defensively and that's important when it comes to getting through a tie like this one and against opponents like Chelsea," the German said.

"We want to create more chances than the first leg. We are capable of progressing and we are going to prepare properly the game, but we have to create a bit more than we did in the first leg."

Former Chelsea star Eden Hazard is available for Madrid and he looms large despite failing to make a major impact in the Spanish capital this season.

"We know what a good player he can be, Eden," Kroos said. "A shame that he hasn't been available in the last few months because of injuries.

"However, he's now doing better, which is so important for him for being at his best. He's a player who has a lot to help us.

"I don't know exactly how he is doing as he's only started one game but he's always a threat to opposition defences. It doesn't matter how much he'll play, it doesn't depend on me, I just hope he can help us."

Pep Guardiola lauded Riyad Mahrez's appetite for the big occasion after the Manchester City winger's brace secured a 2-0 win over Paris Saint-Germain and a place in the Champions League final.

Mahrez's free-kick sealed a 2-1 win at Parc des Princes in last week's first leg and he netted a goal in each half on Tuesday to close out a 4-1 aggregate triumph.

The former Leicester City favourite has found the going tough at times since joining City in 2018 but he is now a go-to pick for Guardiola, his four goals and two assists in this season's competition putting the club one game away from elusive Champions League glory.

"Riyad is an extraordinary player – big talent, huge quality, especially in the big games he is always ready," City manager Guardiola told a post-match news conference.

"We know his quality quite well. He is a fantastic player.

"The players in these stages are judged how they behave in the biggest scenarios, the big tests.

"He loves it and enjoys it. He made a good goal, the first one with right foot and the finish for the second. Three goals over the tie, he deserves big compliments.

Fernandinho was a surprise selection on his 36th birthday, but Guardiola felt the club captain excelled.

"Especially in the second half he was incredible," said Guardiola. "We adjusted a little bit [at half-time] to support John [Stones] and Ruben [Dias].

"He was so good, really, really good. It was his birthday, a big present. He has been an extraordinary captain this season, leading us in bad moments and he played really well."

Guardiola conceded it was strange to play such a key game behind closed doors, even if that has now been a reality of the coronavirus pandemic for almost a year.

Before the match, a group of City fans – some with flares – gathered to welcome the team bus to the ground.

"I have to say it was socially distanced but we loved it," Guardiola said. "It's nice to be in a final but we missed them."

"Of course, it was so weird playing the semi-final of the Champions League in empty stadium.

"The club belongs to the people, that's for sure. We are here for a period but the fans always stay. I am pretty sure they are so proud."

Paris Saint-Germain sporting director Leonardo said while now is not the time to decide what is next for Neymar and Kylian Mbappe, he is "optimistic for the future".

Neymar was unable to lead a comeback on Tuesday as Mbappe watched from the sidelines – PSG beaten 2-0 by Manchester City, who progressed to the Champions League final 4-1 on aggregate.

Last season's runners-up PSG failed to land a single shot on target against City – the first time the French side have failed to do so in a Champions League game since 2003-04.

After falling short of the Istanbul showpiece, attention immediately turned to the futures of star duo Neymar and Mbappe, who are both out of contract in 2022 amid ongoing speculation.

Neymar has previously said "everything is almost settled" in regard to a PSG contract renewal though he continues to be linked with a Barcelona return, while Mbappe has been tipped to join Real Madrid.

"Honestly, now is not the time to decide or announce anything," Leonardo told RMC Sport. "We must be proud of what we have done.

"Our goal is to win. We played better in two out of four halves, we scored weird goals. There are a lot of positive things.

"We got out of very difficult situations during the competition. I'm optimistic for the future."

Riyad Mahrez scored twice for hosts City in Manchester, where PSG star Angel Di Maria was sent off for kicking out at Fernandinho with 21 minutes remaining.

PSG – who will now turn their attention to defending their Ligue 1 crown – were hoping to reach back-to-back finals, but Leonardo added: "We cannot forget what we have done over the past two years. We reached the final and lost 1-0 against a team that won everything. This year, we eliminated Barca and Bayern.

"The objective is always to win. Our form has made us a real candidate to win the Champions League. We must continue. It has been a very complicated year. We must be satisfied."

PSG pair Marco Verratti and Ander Herrera both accused referee Bjorn Kuipers of insulting them on Tuesday.

Verratti and Herrera reacted angrily to the decision to send off Di Maria as PSG became just the third team to receive a red card in both legs of a Champions League semi-final after Deportivo La Coruna-Porto (2003-04) and Lyon-Bayern Munich (2009-10).

"The referee told me 'f*** you' twice," Verratti told RMC Sport post-match. "If I do that, I get a 10-man ban. Of course I talk a lot with the referee, but I never say f*** you."

Herrera added: "We talk about respect with the referees. The referee tonight said f*** off to [PSG midfielder] Leandro Paredes. If we say that, we get a three or four-match ban."

On the incident, Leonardo said: "We talked about that. It's so clear that I don't even comment. It's a shame. I think there were a lot of situations that weren't possible - not being well managed."

Kyle Walker hailed Manchester City's defensive heroics after a 2-0 win over Paris Saint-Germain booked a place in their maiden Champions League final.

First-leg hero Riyad Mahrez scored a goal in each half, giving him three in the tie overall, as Pep Guardiola's side closed out a 4-1 aggregate triumph.

Angel Di Maria's petulant red card for kicking out at Fernandinho meant City enjoyed themselves against a bedraggled PSG during the closing stages, but it was not always that straightforward for the Premier League leaders.

Last-ditch blocks were a feature of a relentless defensive performance, with Ruben Dias' efforts to thwart Ander Herrera and Oleksandr Zinchenko's intervention to deny Neymar particularly impressive.

Walker also tangled superbly with the Brazil superstar and told BT Sport that City's defensive improvement this season has been key to them breaching new ground in Europe.

"Against top-quality players like that you need to put in a shift," he said, after City's back four high-fived their way through key moments.

"I thought John, Ruben and Oleks made some important blocks at crucial times and I thought we controlled the game well, considering the amount of talent they've got up front.

"It's a team game. We all go and celebrate a goal. We're high-fiving when we score goals but fur us as defenders the main thing is keeping clean sheets.

"I think this season we've done tremendously well in doing that and really sharpened up on our defensive duty.

"Blocking a shot is just like scoring a goal for me."

Walker gained possession eight times, more than any of his team-mates, with six tackles another best mark for City.

His three interceptions were matched by Fernandinho and Mahrez, while Stones (four) and Dias (three) led the way in clearances and blocks respectively.

Those efforts were a huge part in City avoiding the heartache they suffered against Liverpool, Tottenham and Lyon over the past three seasons.

"I don't think it’s a matter of being over-anxious, I think it’s putting the pressure on ourselves," the England right-back said.

"Obviously we go back to Anfield when we threw it away in the first leg. In the second leg we tried to bring it back but it wasn't good enough.

"The second year we go to Tottenham, people miss penalties and these things happen but again we probably lost it in the first leg. We were chasing it, coming back here and conceded two quick goals.

"Then last year, under different circumstances it was one leg and it was a proper cup game. Anything can happen in those sort of games.

"To go over there and get the well-earned victory, then beat them 2-0 and keep a clean sheet is full credit to this squad."

Pep Guardiola is "incredibly proud" to reach the Champions League final but quickly turned his focus to the other Manchester City players who have served him well over the past five years.

City won 2-0 at home to Paris Saint-Germain on Tuesday with a brace from Riyad Mahrez to clinch a 4-1 aggregate success in the semi-final.

Premier League leaders City will appear in the final for the first time in their history, taking on Chelsea or Real Madrid.

The defeat of PSG ends a long wait including repeated heartbreaks in the knockout stages of the competition, prompting Guardiola to believe the only difference this season was the fortune on City's side.

That meant he reflected again on past pain and how "unfair" it is for some notable City names to miss out.

Modern greats Vincent Kompany and David Silva both played key roles under Guardiola but left prior to this season's European run.

"People believe it's easy to arrive in the Champions League [final]," the City manager told BT Sport. "People believe because it happened in the past, I have to arrive every year in the final of the Champions League.

"Unfortunately, getting the final of the Champions League now makes sense what we have done the last four years or five years, with a lot of people.

"This is a little bit unfair. Every day, these guys are consistent, these guys have shown the last five years in every competition. This is remarkable.

"I said before, this competition is like this: we won the first game because we shoot between the hips of the opponent.

"Today it was the post for Marquinhos and maybe the penalty is given, even when it's of course not a penalty, and you are out for these little details.

"United won a Champions League because Terry's slippy, you know? United won in the last minute at Camp Nou against Bayern Munich, this competition.

"Madrid won against Atletico Madrid in 93 minutes. It's a competition that is so difficult. There's something, the stars are involved in that.

"But we won 11 games in this competition, just a draw with Porto. We made an incredible Champions League and we have three weeks to prepare the final."

City have won their last seven Champions League matches – the longest ever winning run by an English team in European Cup/Champions League history. Indeed, City are also the first English side to win 11 games in a single European Cup/Champions League campaign.

Kompany and some of his other team-mates were not the only City stars unable to make significant contributions on Tuesday, with record goalscorer Sergio Aguero only a substitute, along with Raheem Sterling and Gabriel Jesus.

Aymeric Laporte, Joao Cancelo and Rodri – vital in the past two seasons – were not even called from the bench.

"I'm incredibly proud," Guardiola said. "But my first thought is always for the players who didn't play today.

"I know for them it is so tough, they deserve to play, but everyone makes their contribution in this Champions League season.

"Now it's time to enjoy it. We have one step to the Premier League and then two or three weeks to prepare the final."

PSG finished with 10 men after Angel Di Maria kicked out at Fernandinho, while tempers frayed and further red cards might have followed.

Guardiola – who ended a run of four consecutive Champions League semi-final eliminations, reaching the final for the first time since 2010-11 with Barcelona – said:: "They are huge competitors. They were the team who were runners up last season, in the French league they win every year. It's a team built to stay there.

"The mentality, all of them are huge competitors. They fought until the end – [Marco] Verratti's a big example, [Leandro] Paredes, Neymar, all of them, a huge, huge team.

"But we were so, so composed. We suffered together, defended inside so well, and we did it. We are in the final of the Champions League, these are nice words."

Paris Saint-Germain duo Marco Verratti and Ander Herrera both accused referee Bjorn Kuipers of insulting them as the club crashed out of the Champions League in the semi-finals.

PSG's bid to reach back-to-back Champions League finals came to an end at the hands of Manchester City, who won 2-0 on Tuesday to progress to the tournament decider for the first time in their history 4-1 on aggregate.

Riyad Mahrez scored twice for City as PSG ended the second leg with 10 men after Angel Di Maria was red carded for kicking out at Fernandinho in the 69th minute.

Verratti and Herrera reacted angrily to the decision to send off Di Maria in Manchester, where PSG became just the third team to receive a red card in both legs of a Champions League semi-final after Deportivo La Coruna-Porto (2003-04) and Lyon-Bayern Munich (2009-10).

After last season's runners-up PSG were left licking their wounds, star midfielder Verratti and team-mate Herrera hit out at Kuipers.

"The referee told me 'f*** you' twice," Verratti told RMC Sport post-match.

"If I do that, I get a 10-man ban. Of course I talk a lot with the referee, but I never say f*** you."

Herrera added: "We talk about respect with the referees. The referee tonight said f*** to [PSG midfielder] Leandro Paredes.

"If we say that, we get a three or four-match ban."

PSG failed to land a single shot on target against City – the first time the French side have failed to do so in a Champions League game since 2003-04.

"We were the best team for 70 minutes," said Herrera. "We attacked, we created problems for a team that is playing very well.

"We can leave with our heads held high. We are of course sad. It is not easy to do so, to be a semi-finalist. We must not change what we did today. We played well. We did everything. There are always things to improve."

Riyad Mahrez was delighted with the way Manchester City effectively countered against Paris Saint-Germain, although he suggested this was not their aim in their Champions League semi-final victory.

City reached the final of Europe's elite club competition for the first time with a 2-0 second-leg win that clinched a 4-1 aggregate triumph.

Mahrez had hit the winner in Paris and added both goals at the Etihad Stadium, where the pitch was covered in hail following a pre-match shower.

His first came following a long pass from Ederson – "It's something we work at all the time," Mahrez said – before Phil Foden led a stunning break for the second.

City were sloppy in possession in the opening stages but defended doggedly and soon found space in attack as PSG pressed forward.

"I don't think it was the game plan, but obviously they had to come at us," Mahrez told BT Sport.

"Sometimes, we were a bit deeper, they lose the ball and we are good at the counter as well. That's how the two goals were. We are happy."

As well as his two goals, Mahrez weighed in with a tackle, two clearances and a block. All 10 outfield starters contributed at least one clearance for City.

"When you play the semi-final of the Champions League, you have to be solid, everybody has to defend, everyone has to contribute defensively," Mahrez added.

"That's what we did. We were very solid today, didn't concede much, and that is why we're in the final."

PSG ended with 10 men after Angel Di Maria was dismissed for stamping on Fernandinho, one of many late incidents as the visitors lost their discipline.

The Ligue 1 giants only conceded 12 fouls but earned five cards and might have got off lightly.

Reflecting on the match, Mahrez said: "It was a very good game. We didn't start good again. I don't think we had a very good first half, but we scored the goal and it was more comfortable after the goal.

"Second half I think we played very good; we had a lot of chances, we could score more.

"Then they lost their nerves and started kicking us. It was good. They had a red card and after it was more comfortable for us."

For much of his pre-match news conference, Pep Guardiola stuck to a familiar mantra of recent weeks.

Manchester City were 2-1 to the good against Paris Saint-Germain, with two away goals in the bank and a first Champions League final within touching distance.

All they had to do was "be who we are" and "be more calm". A two-time winner burnt five times at this stage of the competition with Barcelona and Bayern Munich, Guardiola exuded an authoritative air.

However, when the rampaging nature of some of City's European exits were put to him – most notably Mauricio Pochettino's previous visit to the Etihad Stadium with Tottenham – he conceded there was only so much he could do.

"Nobody can control the chaos," Guardiola said. Perhaps he'd checked the weather forecast.

Enjoying loosened COVID-19 restrictions, Manchester's beer gardens thronged with punters last weekend. A couple of hours before kick-off, a weather front blew in from somewhere near Old Testament Egypt.

Snow and hail flecked the first-half playing surface, but there was little cool about City's opening to proceedings.

Within 30 seconds, Phil Foden charged into Alessandro Florenzi. A minute later Fernandinho – Guardiola's customary flirtation with a surprise selection on these occasions – offered a similarly agricultural "Good evening!" to Angel Di Maria that apparently lingered.

Kyle Walker blocked from Neymar, Bernardo Silva blocked from Di Maria and then Walker erred to be outfoxed by Marco Verratti.

Of all the masterful playmakers on display, Verratti was the one who best retained his balletic poise despite the conditions. After half an hour, the Italy playmaker had completed 28 of his 29 passes, 18 of those probing menacingly inside the City half.

The hosts were creaking when referee Bjorn Kuipers awarded an absurd seventh-minute penalty. The ball struck Oleksandr Zinchenko's shoulder. Kuipers checked the monitor sheepishly and overturned his call while Zinchenko unloaded barrels of frustration and emotional energy in the direction of his assistant.

"Nobody can control the chaos."

Well, maybe Ederson can, high-risk/low-pulse goalkeeping replicant that he is. City finally enjoyed a period of smooth possession, moving the ball back to their Brazilian gloveman.

It might not be exactly "who we are" in Guardiola terms, but Ederson's booming 90-yard pass down the left was immaculate. Zinchenko, propelled by a mixture of shrewd positional play and righteous indignation, charged onto the pass.

Kevin De Bruyne was unable to convert, his shot blocked, but Riyad Mahrez was alert to the loose ball, becoming the second player from an English club to score in both legs of a Champions League semi-final after Sadio Mane in 2017-18.

Still, City did not completely settle. One ludicrously dicey roll out from Ederson to Silva saw Di Maria steal in and fire just wide from outside the box.

However, with Kylian Mbappe convalescing on the bench, PSG began to look a touch one-dimensional. The threat of the France star's electric pace in behind was replaced by Mauro Icardi's cloak of invisibility. By the time the former Inter striker was substituted in the 62nd minute, none of his 16 touches remained in the memory.

Mbappe's absence meant everything was happening in front of City and, although their defence had plenty of work to do, Walker, the irrepressible Zinchenko and John Stones all enjoyed stellar nights.

One exceptional Zinchenko challenge to deny Neymar early in the second half saw Stones envelope his diminutive colleague in a bear hug. At that stage in the contest, it was as valuable as any goal.

Then there was Ruben Dias. Perhaps nobody can control the chaos, but the hulking Portugal centre-back could probably block it.

No City player made more than Dias' three blocks. One of those appeared to be with his nose when Ander Herrera blasted goalwards. The former Benfica skipper bounced back up, looking convinced that there is no more fun to be had in the world than stopping a shot in a Champions League semi-final with your face.

Mahrez might beg to differ. Life in Manchester has not always been easy for the ex-Leicester City favourite, but he is now one of Guardiola's go-to men and a supplier of cutting edge within a team of whirring creators.

Two of those – De Bruyne and the now habitually brilliant Phil Foden – combined to create a wonderful second for Mahrez.

Chaos then consumed PSG, their race run. Di Maria kicked out at Fernandinho – Brazil getting one over on Argentina in that eternal battle of perpetual antagonism – and there was plenty more erratic nonsense to follow. Zinchenko was still adorably furious, but elsewhere there was a steely calm and abundant class in sky blue.

Mahrez rounded out his night of nights by doing a Dias, haring back into his own area to make a block. It nearly summarised a tale of mission almost accomplished, of chaos controlled.

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