Borussia Dortmund star Erling Haaland believes karma played a role in his duel with Sevilla goalkeeper Yassine Bounou, insisting "I scored when he didn't cheat" in the absorbing Champions League last-16 clash.

History-making Haaland netted a brace as Dortmund drew 2-2 with LaLiga visitors Sevilla on Tuesday but advanced to the quarter-finals 5-4 on aggregate.

Haaland became the quickest player to 20 Champions League goals after reaching the milestone in his 14th game in the competition.

The 20-year-old broke the record after scoring a 54th-minute penalty – the in-demand Norway forward celebrating in the face of Bounou following the retaken spot-kick.

Bounou had saved the initial penalty but play was pulled back after he left his line and Haaland made no mistake from 12 yards second time around.

Haaland savoured the moment post-match after the pair exchanged taunts at Signal Iduna Park.

"I missed and then he cheated. So then I took it again and then I scored when he didn't cheat," Haaland said.

"When he was screaming in my face after the first one, I was thinking, oh, it'll be even better to score another goal. And, yeah, that's what happened. So it was nice."

Haaland added: "I think it's karma."

Aged 20 years and 231 days, Haaland also became the youngest player to score in six consecutive Champions League matches, while he is the first player in the history of the competition to score at least two goals in four consecutive appearances.

Led by Haaland, Dortmund will now feature in the Champions League quarter-finals for the first time since 2016-17 after eliminating the Europa League holders.

"To be in the next round feels very big," Haaland said. "We knew they were going to come at us very hard, but when we scored they needed three."

Juventus only had themselves to blame as they crashed out of the Champions League on away goals to 10-man Porto, according to head coach Andrea Pirlo.

A thrilling tie finished 4-4 on aggregate after extra time in Turin, but a 115th-minute free-kick from Sergio Oliveira – who opened the scoring with a first-half penalty – meant Porto progressed despite losing 3-2 on the night.

The brilliant Federico Chiesa scored a second-half brace for Juve and Adrien Rabiot headed home after Oliveira's second to set up a grandstand finish.

But it was not enough, as Cristiano Ronaldo again drew a blank when faced with long-time international team-mate Pepe at the heart of a dogged Porto defence.

Pirlo felt Juventus failing to show similar robust qualities over the course of the tie cost them dear.

"We made four mistakes in two games," he told Sky Sport.

"When you make a mistake four times in the first knockout round of the Champions League, it is normal that you go out.

"We had a good start, there was immediately an opportunity for [Alvaro] Morata. 

"We did not score and the incident in the area cost us an error and a penalty kick. Then we could have conceded another but in the second half we did well."

Juventus had greater control after the interval, although that was aided by Porto striker Mehdi Taremi being sent off for two bookings in quick succession after Chiesa's equaliser.

Further questions will now be asked over rookie coach Pirlo's suitability for one of the top jobs in European football.

Inter are 10 points clear of Juve in Serie A having played a game more, with the Bianconeri's grip on the Scudetto looking far looser than it has at any other time over the past decade.

"It will take a few days [to get over the Porto game]," Pirlo added. 

"We have to focus on the championship by facing every match in the best possible way, to try to move up the table." 

Around the time Massimiliano Allegri guided them to Champions League finals in 2015 and 2017, there would have been a sense of inevitability in any game where Juventus needed a 1-0 home win.

They would approach task with confidence and efficiency and probably win 1-0.

Andrea Pirlo's Juve needed a 1-0 win to progress to the Champions League quarter-finals on Tuesday but had not won a single game by that margin all season. They ended up going out on away goals to 10-man Porto after a thrilling and unwieldly slugfest.

Holding a 2-1 lead from the first leg at Estadio do Dragao. Sergio Conceicao's side lined up with something approaching a back six whenever they were out of possession.

Before the opening half hour was up in Turin, they had managed eight shots and were ahead through Sergio Oliveira's emphatically dispatched spot-kick.

Juve were a rabble. A shadow of the sleek winning machine under Allegri and every inch a team on their way to relinquishing a decade of domestic dominance in Serie A. 

In the years since a judiciously run sporting operation decided to go Galactico, the team beaten by Barcelona and Real Madrid in their most recent final appearances have bowed out to Ajax, Lyon and Porto – each time failing to get the job done on home turf in the second leg.

If this is how Andrea Agnelli oversees the rebuild of a great squad, perhaps UEFA should think twice before letting him revamp the entire Champions League.

No six appeal for Ronaldo

Of course, it is not all Cristiano Ronaldo's fault. He entered the match with 10 goals in as many Champions League home games for Juventus. Were it not for his stunning hat-trick against Atletico Madrid in 2019, they would have three consecutive last-16 exits to their name.

But in a career full of vintage nights, this was nothing of the sort for the five-time Champions League winner.

Ronaldo failed to touch the ball in the Porto area during the first half, missed a glorious chance to head a decisive goal from one of many sumptuous Juan Cuadrado crosses and turned meekly away as Oliveira's drilled free-kick went through the wall and beyond Wojciech Szezesny.

Adrien Rabiot headed home Federico Bernardeschi's corner to set up a grandstand finish and give Juve a joyless 3-2 win on the night, but Oliveira's unlikely brace proved decisive.

For Ronaldo and Juventus, the dream was over. As Erling Haaland continued his phenomenal goalscoring feats in Borussia Dortmund's similarly unhinged aggregate win over Sevilla and on the eve of Kylian Mbappe probably putting Barcelona and Lionel Messi out of their misery, the era might also be over.

Chiesa shows his class

Whoever the leading lights of the next generation prove to be, Federico Chiesa looks worthy of being part of the conversation.

The 23-year-old winger entered this game with two goals and as many assists in his past five outings, including Juve's vital away goal in Porto. He left it having produced a magnificent breakout performance on the biggest stage.

With Ronaldo missing in action, it was Chiesa and Alvaro Morata who took the fight to the visitors, the latter drawing a couple of superb saves from Porto goalkeeper Agustin Marchesin.

Four minutes into the second half, Ronaldo found a touch inside the area and an exquisite one at that. The lay-off was into Chiesa's stride and he opened his body expertly to stroke home.

Then a game that had cracked with low-level excitement exploded into a cacophony of incident and near chaos.

Taremi, such a nuisance to Juve during the first period, became a maddening inconvenience to his own team with two bookings in as many minute – the second for booting the ball away. Everyone can hear the referee's whistle nowadays, Mehdi.

Chiesa looked to have smuggled his and Juve's second, only for the monumental Pepe to hurl his body towards the ball with all the composure of someone trying to smother a live grenade. It hit the post and went wide.

Juventus's most dangerous attacker got a goal more in keeping with the beauty of his overall performance, arriving late at the back post to head Cuadrado's delicious right-wing cross into the top corner.

Chiesa then skipped effortlessly past Jesus Corona, although Marchesin stood firm to prevent the hat-trick. He was more than worthy of the matchball and the win.

In this muddled present dwarfed by a towering recent past, Chiesa provides measure of comfort and a promise of better days ahead for Juve.

Pirlo appears to have passed up his chance of being a part of those, while the clock is louder than ever before on the great Ronaldo – humbled by his dogged and defiant countrymen.

Sergio Oliveira scored twice as 10-man Porto dumped Juventus out of the Champions League with a scintillating away goals victory after a 3-2 second-leg defeat in Turin.

Juventus' task of overturning a 2-1 deficit from the first leg was compounded when Oliveira's penalty gave Porto a the lead after 19 minutes, but Federico Chiesa netted twice in 14 second-half minutes - either side of a red card shown to Porto striker Mehdi Taremi - to take the round-of-16 tie into extra-time.

Oliveira buried a stunning second goal of the night with five minutes left in the second period of extra-time, only for Adrien Rabiot to equalise and set up a tense finish.

Porto held on to spark wild celebrations on the visiting bench as Juve's quest for a first European title since 1996 ended in failure, heaping pressure on head coach Andrea Pirlo.

An Erling Haaland brace led Borussia Dortmund to a 2-2 draw and 5-4 aggregate win over Sevilla that booked their place in the Champions League quarter-finals.

Leading 3-2 from the first leg, the hosts seemed to have put the tie to bed before the hour mark thanks to a poacher's strike and a penalty from their prolific number nine.

But Youssef En-Nesyri halved the deficit from 12 yards with over 20 minutes remaining and then set up a frantic finish to the game with a powerful header in the sixth minute of injury time.

However, Sevilla were unable to find another goal in the final seconds, crashing out of Europe as a result.

No doubt as a consequence of their aggregate advantage, Dortmund started the game cautiously.

Their approach was almost undermined after just three minutes, though, when a loose Emre Can pass allowed Lucas Ocampos to get a shot away that needed saving by Marwin Hitz.

Sevilla were effectively camped outside the hosts' box from that moment onward, forcing them to repel an almost ceaseless barrage of balls into the box.

But the Spaniards were struggling to make their dominance of the ball count and, somewhat inevitably, were made to pay just beyond the half-hour mark.

Thomas Delaney and Nico Schulz combined to dispossess Suso before Mahmoud Dahoud fed Marco Reus, whose pullback provided an easy finish for Haaland.

That meant Sevilla, who had made 304 passes and taken seven shots to their opponent's 172 and two respectively in the first half, trailed at the break.

Buoyed by their goal, Dortmund started the second period brightly, and looked to earn instant reward when Haaland finished off a flowing move by easing Diego Carlos aside and finding the back of the net from a tight angle.

While the Germans did eventually take the lead as part of that passage of play, it was only after a bizarre sequence of events.

A lengthy VAR review saw Haaland's goal disallowed for a shove but a penalty awarded for a shirt pull from Jules Kounde much earlier in the build-up.

Though the Norwegian could not beat Yassine Bounou with his spot-kick, play was again pulled back for the goalkeeper leaving his line, allowing for another attempt from 12 yards that nestled in the goal.

That strike put Dortmund 5-3 up and seemingly ended the tie, but it did not excuse Emre Can's inexplicable decision to hand Sevilla a penalty of their own for a push on Luuk de Jong in the box.

The German's nerves and that of his team-mates will have been jangling when En-Nesyri, who had dispatched the spot-kick in emphatic fashion, headed home a cross deep in injury time.

But Sevilla could not make the most of pinball in the box as Edin Terzic's men held on.

What does it mean?

Struggling in the Bundesliga, Dortmund might wonder if they have a chance of a shock Champions League win this season thanks to the goals of the talismanic Haaland.

As for Sevilla, they are left to reflect on the disappointment of being unable to bring their incredible knack for Europa League success to Europe's premier cup competition.

Haaland does it again

Dortmund doubtless owe their place in the last eight to Haaland, who became the first player to score twice in four consecutive Champions League games here.

The Norwegian did that from just two shots - proof of his deadliness - but also made more passes in the opposition half than any of his team-mates, and provided one key pass.

Can struggles in defence

He may have ended up on the winning side, but this was not a performance to write home about from Can.

The former Liverpool midfielder started the game by gifting possession to Ocampos in a dangerous area and did not get much better from there.

He gave away a penalty, picked up a yellow card, and completed just 71.4 per cent of his passes as part of a nervy individual showing.

What's next?

Dortmund's bid to climb the German top-flight table resumes when they face Hertha Berlin at home on Saturday.

As for Sevilla, they must look to end a four-game winless streak to keep their top-four hopes in La Liga on track, with the derby against Real Betis next up on Sunday.

Erling Haaland has become the quickest player to 20 Champions League goals after reaching the milestone in his 14th game in the competition.

The Norwegian grabbed his 19th and 20th goals in Europe's premier cup competition to help Borussia Dortmund carve out a 2-0 lead over Sevilla in the second leg of the sides' last-16 tie.

That ensured he comfortably surpassed Harry Kane's previous record, which he set by scoring 20 times in his first 24 games in the Champions League.

Dortmund's meeting with Sevilla also saw Haaland become the first player ever to score twice in four consecutive games in the tournament.

The 20-year-old began his streak by netting twice in back-to-back fixtures against Club Brugge in the group stages.

And, after repeating the feat against Sevilla in Spain, he once again put Julien Lopetegui's side to the sword at Signal Iduna Park.

Georginio Wijnaldum admits he would be "devastated" if he leaves Liverpool at the end of the season.

The 30-year-old Dutch midfielder is due to reach the end of his contract in June, and there is no sign of a breakthrough in talks over a renewal.

Wijnaldum has been linked with clubs including Barcelona and Inter, and his Anfield career could be close to an end.

Speaking on Tuesday, ahead of Liverpool's Champions League last-16 second-leg clash with RB Leipzig in Budapest, Wijnaldum said it would be tough to leave the Premier League giants.

"The only thing I can say is I'm really happy at the club - really happy with the team, the staff and really happy with the fans," Wijnaldum said.

"It's not that easy, like everyone thinks it is, to make some decisions for your future because you have to think about everything. You have to negotiate with the club and it's so difficult to deal with all kinds of things and that's why it takes so long.

"And also, with the situation we're in right now, it's not the most important thing right now: the most important thing is to get back on track, to start winning games again, and then we will see.

"My family is happy here, but beside that there is no news."

Asked how difficult it would be to walk away from Liverpool, Wijnaldum said: "Really difficult, because if that happened you would leave a team you really love.

"I would be devastated that I don't get to play with this team any more, that would be for sure."

Liverpool hold a 2-0 lead against Leipzig as they return to the Puskas Arena, and the Champions League is now seemingly their last hope of silverware this season after a shocking dip in form in the Premier League.

"Of course, the Champions League can rescue this season," said Wijnaldum. "But I think a lot of people only say it's rescued if you win the Champions League and everyone knows how difficult it is."

He opened up about the strain that Liverpool's drastic mid-season dip has taken on the team.

"It hit us hard, everyone can see it," Wijnaldum said. "There is confidence in the team and in the players and in each other, but I think it's less than we're used to, because of the situation we're in with the injuries, players getting COVID, and also the results have not been in our favour.

"It's a new situation we are in right now. We were used to winning games and winning trophies and now it's totally the opposite, so I think the confidence is less than in previous years."

He said Liverpool's form at Anfield, where they have lost six consecutive Premier League after a run of 68 unbeaten home matches, has been "really shocking" to the players.

Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp still sees cause to be optimistic about the team's future, and he is eyeing success in Europe to counter what has been a grim run of domestic form.

Klopp listed the reasons to be hopeful, saying: "The team, the moments we had on the pitch, the competition, the quality of the boys and football in general, because you will always have a chance in the next game and that's already enough."

The German manager added in Tuesday's news conference: "I have no doubts about us for tomorrow, not that I know we will go through 100 per cent but I know we will give Leipzig a proper fight."

Mauricio Pochettino explained he simply could not risk Neymar as he is "not in a condition to compete" against former club Barcelona on Wednesday.

The world's most expensive footballer suffered an adductor injury playing for Paris Saint-Germain against Caen in the Coupe de France on February 10.

Initial predictions suggested Neymar could return for the Champions League last-16 second leg this week.

PSG won the first match 4-1 at Camp Nou and Neymar has been progressing in training, with Pochettino repeatedly insisting he was on schedule.

But the head coach acknowledged last week he was not guaranteed to be back in the squad for the visit of the Blaugrana.

A medical update from the club on Tuesday subsequently confirmed Neymar would miss out, and Pochettino added in his news conference that an appearance had become unrealistic.

"It is not a decision," he told a news conference. "The fact is the player cannot play. He is not in a condition to compete.

"He made a great effort to get back quickly, but the goal is not just the Champions League.

"It's a difficult time for him but I hope he can come back as soon as possible."

Wednesday's encounter will be the 21st game Neymar has missed this season, playing just 18 times in all competitions.

Since joining PSG in 2017, he has made 25 Champions League appearances - scoring 20 goals and assisting nine - but only six of these outings have come in the knockout stages. Five of the six were in the 2019-20 run to the final.

Although Neymar will be absent again, he at least will not be in the opposition XI as he was just months before moving to Paris, inspiring Barca's epic 6-1 second-leg win to complete a remarkable aggregate comeback in 2016-17.

However, Barca were at home for the second leg on that occasion and no team in the history of the European Cup has advanced after reaching the halfway point of a tie three or more goals behind with the away match still to play.

Pochettino, only appointed at PSG this year, certainly has no concerns about history repeating itself, even if he is guarded against complacency.

"For us, the past goes back to January 3, when we joined the club," he said.

"It's a game we have to go through to reach the next round. That will be our approach from the first minute.

"We have to be consistent for 90 minutes. In football, the most important thing is to be focused.

"We're going to start as if it were 0-0 and we want to win to qualify."

That focus means Pochettino had little interest in entertaining talk on the future of Kylian Mbappe, the hat-trick hero in the first leg.

"This is a situation that the club has been managing for a long time," Pochettino said. "As I have always said, both sides must agree.

"But both the club and the player are focused on meeting the goals that the club set at the start of the season, arriving at the end of the season having achieved or gone close to those goals."

Jurgen Klopp has dismissed suggestions he could succeed Joachim Low as Germany head coach.

The Liverpool manager said on Tuesday that he remained committed to last season's Premier League champions.

Low announced earlier in the day that he would end his 15-year career as Germany boss after the Euro 2020 finals.

Klopp's name led the way in polls conducted in Germany to judge the public view of who should replace Low, but the 53-year-old former Borussia Dortmund coach counted himself out.

When asked whether the job may have come too soon for him in his career, Klopp said: "Maybe you should ask the question differently, if I'm available for the job of manager or coach of the German national team after the summer - no.

"Joachim Low did an incredible job for so many years. I think he's the longest servant we've had in Germany and one of the most successful. He did an incredible job.

"I understand he wants to have this highlight at the European Championship and try to squeeze anything out he can in this tournament and then somebody else will do the job.

"I'm pretty sure that with the amount of really good German managers at the moment, the German FA will find a good solution."

Speaking to German reporters, Klopp indicated the timing was not right for him to move into international football, given he has three years remaining on his Liverpool contract.

Klopp's team face RB Leipzig in the Champions League in Budapest on Wednesday, guarding a 2-0 lead from the first leg.

Ronald Koeman maintains another miraculous comeback against Paris Saint-Germain is not beyond Barcelona's capabilities, especially with Lionel Messi in the side.

Barca head to the Parc des Princes on Wednesday trailing 4-1 from the first leg of their Champions League last-16 tie.

Kylian Mbappe scored a hat-trick in PSG's commanding win at Camp Nou last month, leaving Barca requiring a remarkable result in France if they are to go through, with no team having ever progressed from a knockout tie in the competition's history after losing the first leg at home by three goals or more.

The Catalans are also on a miserable run away from home in Europe, having won only once in their past nine such knockout stage matches, failing to score in six of those games.

Barca pulled off an unforgettable comeback against PSG four years ago, recovering from losing the first leg 4-0 in Paris to progress after a sensational 6-1 win at home.

Koeman accepts a repeat of that famous 'remontada' is less likely given PSG are the home side for the second leg on this occasion, and the Barca boss does not believe Mauricio Pochettino's men will be afraid of history repeating itself.

However, even with centre-backs Gerard Pique and Ronald Araujo missing through injury, Koeman will not give up on Messi and Barca producing another match to remember.

"We had a bad result in the reverse fixture. It all depends on how we start the game. We'll try to make life difficult," he told reporters on Tuesday.

"It depends on our effectiveness. They had a lot in the first game. We go out to win on any pitch. We always create a lot of chances. Nothing is impossible.

"The comeback in the Copa del Rey [against Sevilla] has given us confidence, but it's not the same to come back from 2-0 at home as coming back from 4-1 away, and PSG are a very strong team.

"To be able to have any chance, we have to have a complete night and have a huge amount of effectiveness. But we'll try. Hopefully, we can make things tough.

"We have to go out strong and play our game and create chances. If, after the game, we have the feeling we've given our utmost, we'll see what the result is. The worst thing that can happen is to think we haven't tried, or we haven't given everything.

"Of course, if we think we can come back, we need every player at their best level. If Leo is able to play one of his best games, everything is possible.

"He can decide any game in any moment. But it shouldn't only be him at his best level, but the whole team. We need luck, too.

"I don't think PSG are scared of us. I'm sure their coach will prepare them in the best way so they don't think it's an easy game, but there are circumstances that are totally different for a comeback [this time].

"It's always easier playing the second leg at home than away. We need to play our game. I'm sure they have confidence in their new coach."

Midfielder Frenkie de Jong thinks Barca's comeback against Sevilla, when they won 3-0 after extra time at Camp Nou to overturn a 2-0 Copa semi-final deficit, proves the players are united behind their coach.

With Neymar still unavailable due to an adductor injury, De Jong is keeping faith in his side's chances.

"The main objective is always to qualify," he said. "We're going to compete and see how things go.

"We're always united. Recently, we've been getting good results, and we're united as a team – you could see that against Sevilla.

"I don't know if 4-1 was fair, but we played that game badly. We're going to Paris to give a good image of ourselves, to compete.

"Neymar is among the best in the world. The fact he's not available is better for us. If Neymar isn't there, the opposition are less strong."

Paris Saint-Germain star Neymar has been ruled out of the Champions League last-16 second leg against Barcelona.

The 29-year-old has been sidelined since suffering an adductor injury against Caen in the Coupe de France on February 10.

Having missed the thumping 4-1 first-leg victory at Camp Nou, Neymar had been hoping to return for the visit of his old club to the French capital, even if he was likely to be a substitute.

However, PSG issued an update on Tuesday to confirm the Brazil international remains out of action as he continues individual recovery work.

Left-back Juan Bernat is also still sidelined due to a knee injury, while striker Moise Kean is isolating after returning a positive coronavirus test last week.

The Champions League round-of-16 second legs get underway on Tuesday, with Porto and Borussia Dortmund holding the upper hand over Juventus and Sevilla respectively.

Juve's latest bid to bring their domestic dominance to bear on the European stage is hanging by a thread, with Sergio Conceicao's robust side arriving in Turin 2-1 to the good.

If that tie is on a knife edge, Dortmund's task looks slightly more straightforward on paper – their 3-2 first-leg win having come on the road at the Ramon Sanchez Pizjuan.

However, Edin Terzic's side might be wounded by their sapping Klassiker loss to Bayern Munich at the weekend and Sevilla boast formidable European pedigree. Stranger things have definitely happened.

So, to help you navigate the potential madness, we take a closer look at both matches using Opta data.

 

Juventus (1) v (2) Porto: Ronaldo aiming to break the shackles

On his return to his homeland, Juventus superstar Cristiano Ronaldo found himself unusually frustrated during the first leg.

The five-time Ballon d'Or winner managed just one shot – his lowest return in a Champions League knockout match since he failed to register a shot on goal during the second leg of the 2010-11 semi-final between Real Madrid and Barcelona.

However, Federico Chiesa's crucial late away goal at the Estadio do Dragao snapped a run of five consecutive clean sheets in this season's competition for Porto, who are looking to achieve three consecutive shutouts on the road for the first time since November 2012.

Nevertheless, history is still weighted against the Primeira Liga club finishing the job.

Porto are winless in their previous 13 away games in the Champions League knockout stages, drawing four and losing nine.

You have to go back to a 3-2 win over Milan in 1996 for their most recent victory in Italy, with five defeats on the spin since then.

On the other hand, Juventus have been eliminated on five of the past six occasions they lost the first leg of a Champions League tie.

The exception came when a Ronaldo hat-trick wiped out Atletico Madrid's 2-0 advantage two seasons ago.

Once again, the 36-year-old looks their most likely hero. Ronaldo has 10 goals in 10 Champions League games for Juve at the Allianz Stadium. Only Lionel Messi (14) has more home goals over the period from the start of the 2018-19 campaign onwards.

 

Borussia Dortmund (3) v (2) Sevilla: Haaland at the double again?

Erling Haaland is at the opposite end of his Champions League journey to Ronaldo but certainly seems to have designs on emulating some of the veteran's great deeds and might even breach new ground this week.

The Dortmund striker has scored a brace in each of his past three Champions League appearances. If he nets another double against Sevilla, he will become the first player in the history of the competition to score twice in four consecutive appearances.

Haaland has 18 goals in 13 Champions League outings overall and appears certain to surpass Harry Kane as the quickest man to 20 in terms of games. The England captain reached the landmark in his 24th appearance.

Dortmund are aiming to reach the quarter-finals for the first time since 2017 and are unbeaten in seven Champions League matches at Signal Iduna Park (W5 D2).

Sevilla have never gone through in Europe's top competition after losing the first leg of a knockout tie, going down to Real Madrid in 1957-58, Fenerbahce in 2007-08 and Bayern Munich in 2017-18.

Since beating Borussia Monchengladbach 3-0 in 2015, the Andalusian club have lost three out of four against Bundesliga opponents.

Head coach Julen Lopetegui has similarly unhelpful memories of Germany, having lost his only previous Champions League away match in the country 6-1 when he led Porto against Bayern Munich.

Leipzig full-back Angelino insists the pressure is on Liverpool and believes the German side can still win their Champions League last-16 tie.

Liverpool won the first leg 2-0 in Budapest three weeks ago, with the second leg to be played on Wednesday in the Hungarian capital again.

The first leg was tighter than the scoreline suggested with Mohamed Salah and Sadio Mane pouncing to score early second-half goals.

That combined with the Reds' recent domestic struggles will offer Leipzig confidence they can turn around the tie.

"I would say the pressure is more on them than us. We’re the underdogs," ex-Manchester City man Angelino said.

"If we don’t make big mistakes and put our chances away, we can turn the situation around. There are still 90 minutes to go.”

Andrea Pirlo wants his Juventus side to be "clever" and "patient" as they seek to overcome a slender deficit against Porto and claim a place in the Champions League quarter-finals.

Mehdi Taremi and Moussa Marega caught Juve cold at the start of each half at Estadio do Dragao last month.

Federico Chiesa reduced the arrears late on, although the fact that was the first time Porto had conceded in six Champions League matches underlined the scale of the task still to come in Turin on Tuesday.

"The result is open, we will have to be clever in knowing how to manage the match to obtain qualification," Pirlo told a pre-match news conference.

"It is a decisive match for our Champions League campaign."

 "We will have to play a very technical game, because we will face a very compact team, with two very narrow lines and with little space and little time to think.

"It will take technique and patience."

Juventus' domestic dominance over the past decade has not translated onto the European stage, with final defeats in 2015 and 2017 to Barcelona and Real Madrid respectively proving tough to take.

Pirlo made his final Juve appearance as a player in the former showpiece, as goals from Ivan Rakitic, Luis Suarez and Neymar saw Barca run out 3-1 winners in Berlin.

"We know the importance and the beauty of playing in the Champions League," he said.

"When you can play these games there is a totally different energy, but it must be faced just like all other important games."

Juventus captain Leonardo Bonucci echoed his boss' sentiments.

"We must be careful not to get caught up in the desire to score immediately at all costs," he said.

"We expect a Porto side that will come here to play, not to defend."

The Serie A champions would be even more up against it had Chiesa not continued an impressive individual season by getting on the scoresheet.

Italy winger Chiesa has scored nine goals and chipped in with seven assists across all competitions this season.

His 40 chances created are second only to Alvaro Morata (44) among Juventus' forwards, while his 19.6 per cent shot conversion rate is slightly better than Cristiano Ronaldo's (18.2), even though the five-time Ballon d'Or winner is once again riding high with 27 goals in the 2020-21 campaign.

"He doesn't allow himself to be influenced by pressure, he is very genuine and spontaneous, and quickly understood what it means to wear this shirt," Bonucci said of the 23-year-old Chiesa. "He's giving us so much."

Bonucci could be joined in defence by his long-time colleague Giorgio Chiellini, who has recovered from a calf problem to slightly mitigate Mathijis de Ligt's absence due to muscular injuries.

Pirlo expects Weston McKinnie to be involved despite managing a hip problem, although the USA international will not be fit enough for the entire match.

Paris Saint-Germain will "fight to the death" to win a first-ever Champions League this season, according to head coach Mauricio Pochettino. 

The Ligue 1 champions go into Wednesday's last-16 second leg against Barcelona at the Parc des Princes well placed to reach the quarter-finals after a thumping 4-1 win over Ronald Koeman's side in the reverse fixture last month., 

Indeed, no team in the history of the competition has failed to progress from a knockout tie over two legs after winning the first leg by a margin of three goals away from home. 

They have also scored at least once in each of their last 22 Champions League games at home (61 goals), in a run that dates back to December 2015. The last team to keep a clean sheet away at PSG in the competition was Barca's LaLiga rivals Real Madrid (0-0 in October 2015).

PSG were beaten in last year's final by Bayern Munich – Kingsley Coman scoring the only goal in a slender win for the Bundesliga side – but Pochettino insisted the painful memories of that defeat will not derail them this term. 

"Clearly, it is the ambition of the club to win [the competition]," he told the LFP.  

"There are a lot of other teams who want to win it; it's not that easy. We are aware of our responsibility, and we will fight to the death to achieve it.

"We are unaffected by the past. We came here with a free spirit and without prejudice. These ideas convey only negativity. 

"Staying focused on the past limits your future possibilities. We come with new energy. We think that we have the potential to remain in contention in the Champions League. 

"In football, conviction brings you closer to winning."

Pochettino was in charge of Barca's city rivals Espanyol between 2009 and 2012, although he said that does not provide him with any extra impetus to knock them out of the competition. 

"I am not a fan of Espanyol who goes beyond the limits," he added. "Winning in Barcelona has a special flavor.

"But we want to win for PSG, for our players, for the fans, and finally, for ourselves."

The French giants eased to a 3-0 victory over Brest in the last 32 of the Coupe de France on Saturday to make it 12 wins, one draw and two defeats in Pochettino's first two months in charge after replacing Thomas Tuchel. 

The Argentinian is clearly enjoying his time at the helm of a club he played for between 2001 and 2003 and has cited training as the most stimulating aspect of his job.

"Coming to training every morning, being with the players, the staff, trying to improve, that's what motivates me," he said. "Maybe I even have more motivation to go to the training centre than to be in competition. 

"Within the staff, we believe a lot in the preparation, the building of a state of form. Motivation, concentration, it is built day by day."

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