France, England, Switzerland, Sweden and the Czech Republic qualified for the last 16 of Euro 2020 due to results on Monday.

With Finland and Ukraine finishing on three points in Group B and C respectively, four nations were guaranteed to advance ahead of their third matches of the tournament and Switzerland's spot in the next stage was also sealed.

Finland and Ukraine can only watch on and hope they can scrape through as one of the best four third-placed teams after they suffered defeats in their final group games, both finishing with three points.

A 2-0 defeat to Belgium resulted in Finland missing out on second place to Denmark, who knocked Russia out with a resounding 4-1 win in Copenhagen.

Ukraine were beaten 1-0 by Austria earlier in the day, missing out on a top-two spot to Franco Foda's side - who progressed from the group stage for the first time in a European Championship.

Switzerland will qualify along with Italy and Wales in Group A, having amassed four points.

The Czech Republic and England meet at Wembley on Tuesday knowing they will go through, as they both have four points to their name.

The same goes for Group F leaders and world champions France ahead of their final match against holders Portugal on Wednesday.

Group E leaders Sweden will start their encounter with Poland on Wednesday knowing even a defeat would see them through, as they lead the way with four points.

Denmark remarkably booked their place in the last 16 of Euro 2020 with a stirring 4-1 win over Russia in Copenhagen on Monday. 

After losing 1-0 to Finland – a game overshadowed by the cardiac arrest suffered by Christian Eriksen – and 2-1 to Belgium, Denmark's hopes of making the knockout stages were slim before the clash at the Parken Stadium. 

Kasper Hjulmand's side delivered a sensational display, though, to claim a first win of the tournament – and seal second spot in Group B courtesy of Finland's defeat to Belgium – Mikkel Damsgaard and Yussuf Poulsen putting them 2-0 up before the hour mark. 

Artem Dzyuba pulled one back for Russia from the penalty spot, but Denmark secured a thrilling victory late on thanks to goals from Andreas Christensen and Joakim Maehle, sparking jubilant scenes in the Danish capital and setting up a showdown with Wales in Amsterdam on Saturday. 

Denmark will have to show more quality in front of goal in Monday's Euro 2020 clash with Russia if they are to have any hope of progressing from Group B.

Kasper Hjulmand's side have scored from just one of their 43 shots in this year's tournament, while their opponents have had seven shots against them and scored three times.

After losing 1-0 to Finland – a game overshadowed by the cardiac arrest suffered by Christian Eriksen – and 2-1 to Belgium, Denmark are now in the last chance saloon.

They can finish second if they beat Russia and Finland lose to Belgium, depending on the goals scored in those two matches, while only a win will do for third place.

Following positive updates on the health of Eriksen, who has been discharged from hospital, Hjulmand's focus for now is on getting three points against Russia in Copenhagen.

"No matter what, we shall go out there and try to win the match," he said. "It's going to be an unbelievably hard match against Russia.

"They are coming to Parken with a result they can use for something. We shouldn't force anything. We have to keep a level head."

Russia put their 3-0 loss to Belgium behind them with a 1-0 win over Finland last time out and will advance to the last 16 with a victory on Monday, while a draw may be enough.

The visitors have had a day's extra rest than Denmark, but head coach Stanislav Cherchesov insists there will be more to the game than fitness alone.

"That can be important at major tournaments, but not necessarily vital," Cherchesov said. "What will be vital is the tactics, the team, our approach. 

"I have no doubt that we will play at our best level. Our task is to do our job well and get the result."

PLAYERS TO WATCH

Russia – Artem Dzyuba

Zenit forward Dzyuba exchanged passes with Aleksey Miranchuk for Russia's winner against Finland – albeit for a goal that was all about the quality of his team-mate's finish – to make it 22 goal involvements in his last 21 international appearances.

That includes 14 goals, the most recent of those coming in March's World Cup qualifying win over Slovenia. Dzyuba has showed that there is more to his game than scoring goals, and Russia will need their captain to be on top of his game on Monday. 

Denmark – Martin Braithwaite

Barcelona forward Braithwaite had seven of his side's 21 shots against Belgium without finding the net – the most by a Denmark player in a Euros match since Preben Elkjaer Larsen had 10 against Spain at Euro 1984.

He found himself in some promising positions in that loss to the world's top-ranked side, and was desperately unlucky not to score from a late header that hit the crossbar, but Denmark could do with one of Braithwaite's efforts ending in the opposition net.

KEY OPTA FACTS

– Since the dissolution of the USSR, Russia and Denmark have only met once, in a friendly at Copenhagen's Parken Stadium in February 2012. Russia won 2-0.

– Russia kept a clean sheet last time out against Finland. They had conceded in 16 of their previous 17 major tournament games (Euros and World Cup), since keeping consecutive shutouts against Greece and Sweden at Euro 2008.

– Denmark have suffered defeat in each of their two group stage games at Euro 2020. They have twice previously lost all three of their group games in a European Championships tournament, doing so at Euro 1988 and Euro 2000.

– Russia are looking to record back-to-back wins at the European Championship for the first time since winning three in a row at Euro 2008, the first two wins of which were their final two group games.

– Yussuf Poulsen scored Denmark's goal in their 2-1 defeat to Belgium. Poulsen has only scored in consecutive appearances once for his national side, doing so in June 2018 against Mexico in a friendly and Peru at the World Cup.

Christian Eriksen has been discharged from hospital following successful heart surgery, with the Denmark midfielder thanking the football world for the "incredible" support he has received.

Eriksen was given CPR on the pitch during last Saturday's match between Denmark and Finland having suffered a cardiac arrest during the first half.

It was confirmed he would be fitted with an implant to help regulate his heart rhythm and the Danish Football Association (DBU) announced on Friday that the operation was a success.

"Christian Eriksen has been through a successful operation and was today discharged from Rigshospitalet," a short statement read.

"Today he also visited the national team in Helsingor - and from there he will go home and spend time with his family."

An outpouring of public support followed the worrying scenes in Copenhagen after Eriksen collapsed on the pitch and Denmark's 2-1 defeat to Belgium on Thursday was stopped for a minute's applause 10 minutes into the contest.

"Thank you for the massive number of greetings - it has been incredible to see and feel," Eriksen said.

"The operation went well and I am doing well under the circumstances. It was really great to see the guys again after the fantastic game they played last night.

"No need to say, that I will be cheering them on against Russia on Monday."

Having lost their first two games, Denmark need to beat Russia in their final Group B match to have any chance of progressing to the last 16.

Belgium and the Netherlands joined Italy in booking their place in the knockout stages of Euro 2020 with victories over Denmark and Austria respectively.

The world's top-ranked side Belgium had to bounce back from a goal down to beat an inspired Denmark, with both teams paying tribute to Christian Eriksen after 10 minutes as the midfielder continues his recovery from a cardiac arrest.

Roberto Martinez's side need a point in their final Group B match to make certain of top spot, but the Netherlands are already through as Group C winners after seeing off Austria.

Ukraine also picked up all three points against North Macedonia in Thursday's action – just their second-ever victory at the European Championships.

Using Opta data, we take a look at some of the best facts from across the day's action.

Ukraine 2-1 North Macedonia: Shevchenko's men end losing Euros streak

Andriy Yarmolenko and Roman Yaremchuk were on target for the second match running to end Ukraine's six-game losing streak at the European Championships.

With Yarmolenko and Yaremchuk's first-half goals, Ukraine became the first nation to have the same two players score in their first two games at a single Euros.

Ezgjan Alioski pulled one back at the second attempt after his penalty was saved, making it two goals in three games – as many as in his previous 17 for North Macedonia.

His penalty was given after a foul on Goran Pandev, who – at at 37 years and 325 days – is the oldest player to win a spot-kick in the Euros since data was first recorded in 1980.

Ruslan Malinovskyi failed to convert from 12 yards late on in a game which saw both sides win a penalty in the competition for the first time since England v France in 2004.

It means four of the six penalties taken at Euro 2020 have not been converted. The last tournament with more was Euro 2000 (five).

Denmark 1-2 Belgium: Red Devils bounce back from early setback

Belgium showed why they are ranked number one in the world as they recovered from an early setback to make it 11 wins from their last 12 group games at major competitions.

However, they had to do things the hard way after Yussuf Poulsen struck early on in Copenhagen.

Poulsen opened the scoring after 99 seconds – the second-earliest goal ever in the tournament, behind only Dmitry Kirichenko for Russia against Greece in 2004 (65 seconds).

The one shot on target Belgium managed in the first half came via Dries Mertens, who was earning his 100th cap for his country – the fifth Belgian to reach that landmark.

But the half-time introduction of Kevin De Bruyne for Mertens transformed the Red Devils, the playmaker setting up Thorgan Hazard's leveller and then drilling in the winner.

De Bruyne's fantastic strike was teed up by Eden Hazard, who joins the Manchester City star as the two European players to assist a goal at each of the last four major tournaments.

Belgium survived a nervy finish as they won their first two European Championship matches for the first time, while Denmark have lost their first two for the first time since 2000.

Netherlands 2-0 Austria: Faultless Oranje ease through

The Netherlands followed up their opening-game win against Ukraine with a routine victory against Austria in Amsterdam.

It is the third time the Oranje have won their opening two Euros matches, having previously done so in 2000 and 2008, when they exited the competition at the semi-final and quarter-final stage respectively.

Frank de Boer's men are now unbeaten in their last nine matches at major tournaments, which is the longest run by a European nation since Portugal went 12 without defeat between 2014 and 2018.

Memphis Depay opened the scoring for the Netherlands from the penalty spot, the Lyon forward's eighth goal for his country since De Boer took charge last September, with only Belgium's Romelu Lukaku scoring more (10) across all competitions for a European side over that period.

Denzel Dumfries added the second goal and is just the second Netherlands player to net in his first two appearances at the Euros after Ruud van Nistelrooy in 2004, this after the right-back failed to score in his first 19 senior caps.

One of the unsung stars for the hosts was Dumfries' fellow defender Matthijs de Ligt, who completed 100 per cent of his 40 passes – a record for a Netherlands player in a European Championship match since records began in 1980.

Belgium planned to kick the ball out of play after 10 minutes against Denmark to pay their own mark of respect to Christian Eriksen. The world's top-ranked football nation were perhaps not anticipating, however, that they would be chasing the game – and indeed Danish shadows – at that early stage in the match.

In the end the referee, Bjorn Kuipers, seemingly had to remind the Belgium players to bring the contest to a temporary halt, sparking emotional scenes as supporters and players - Eriksen's current and former club-mates Romelu Lukaku, Jan Vertonghen and Toby Alderweireld among them – applauded in unison.

It was that type of occasion and that type of start for Denmark as they produced a fitting tribute to stricken team-mate Eriksen, who was likely to have been watching on from his hospital bed barely 400 yards away, where he continues to recover from a cardiac arrest.

Football was put into perspective the moment Eriksen went to ground in the Danes' opening Group B defeat to Finland – he was "gone", in the words of team doctor Morten Boesen – but thankfully updates in the five days since the incident have been largely positive.

Whether we will see the Inter playmaker on a field again remains to be seen; that he is able to smile and laugh once more with his colleagues is a huge victory in its own right. A bigger victory, indeed, than Denmark were on course for against Belgium until the Kevin De Bruyne show ensued.

 

Long before the Manchester City playmaker's half-time arrival, just 99 seconds into the game at a raucous Parken Stadium, Yussuf Poulsen finished expertly into the bottom-left corner for the second-quickest goal in European Championship history.

Poulsen profited from a Jason Denayer error, the Lyon defender looking rusty in the early stages after returning to the side in place of Dedryck Boyata at the back following a rare day off in the 3-0 win over Russia.

Roberto Martinez's Belgian charges lived up to their tag as the world's number one side in their previous match against Russia, and the professionalism of this performance – as bad as they were in the first half – will arguably heighten expectations that they can go all the way when at full strength.

Belgium mustered just one attempt in the first half – a flicked effort from Dries Mertens on his 100th cap.

The last time they managed only one effort in the opening 45 minutes was in a 2-0 loss to Spain in September 2016, Martinez's first at the helm, which preceded a run of just three defeats in their next 56 matches.

Denmark could not quite add their name to that rare list of nations to have conquered the Red Devils over the last five years, with the visitors' quality eventually shining through. Make that De Bruyne's quality.

Still recovering from a facial injury sustained in Manchester City's Champions League loss to Chelsea last month, the playmaker was introduced for the start of the second half and made an instant impact.

Against the run of play, Lukaku turned his marker and pulled the ball back for De Bruyne to tee up the unmarked Thorgan Hazard. The finish from six yards was simple, the build-up to it anything but.

That assist made De Bruyne the only European player to set up a goal in each of the last four major international tournaments and he added his own name to the scoresheet 16 minutes later.

Another flowing team move culminated in De Bruyne driving a low shot past Kasper Schmeichel. A broken nose and a broken eye socket for De Bruyne; broken dreams for Denmark as their tournament hopes are now perhaps as good as over.

This game was never solely about the result, though – one that ensures safe passage through to the knockout stages for Belgium with a game, against Finland, to spare.

The defining moment was not Denayer's error, De Bruyne's match-changing introduction or Martin Braithwaite skimming the crossbar at the end, but rather the moment when all within the stadium united to pay respect to the popular Eriksen.

"All of Denmark is with you, Christian," a banner in one of the stands read. And boy did Denmark's players show that as they gave Belgium's hugely talented squad a run for their money.

Kevin De Bruyne's match-turning performance in Belgium's 2-1 victory over Denmark was hailed as "very impressive" by coach Roberto Martinez.

After missing Belgium's 3-0 win against Russia due to an acute nose bone fracture suffered in the Champions League final, De Bruyne made a goalscoring return to action in Copenhagen on Thursday.

Yussuf Poulsen scored in the second minute of the Euro 2020 clash to give Denmark the lead, but Thorgan Hazard levelled for Belgium nine minutes into the second half after being teed up by substitute De Bruyne.

De Bruyne then fired the winner with 20 minutes to go, lashing home a brilliant shot from the edge of the penalty area.

The introduction of De Bruyne for the start of that second half proved a key tactical switch, and Martinez said the change was as much about gaining his experience as his quality.

"You never doubt Kevin De Bruyne's talent," Martinez told reporters.

"Obviously it's a big ask to come on at half-time and be able to affect the game the way he did it.

"It's not just about talent, it's also about his know-how, and the way he played in the second half he didn't look like a player that has been through surgery, that has been away from the football pitch.

"Again, it shows you the way he has looked after himself, the way he has been focused in training. But I don't think anyone could doubt his talent.

"This was a very impressive way for a player who has been away for a long time to introduce himself and affect the game in that way."

Martinez said that the atmosphere inside Parken Stadium was a factor in Denmark making a strong start to the game.

Kasper Hjulmand's side were playing their first game since midfielder Christian Eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest during their opening game, a 1-0 defeat to Finland.

Banners bearing messages to Eriksen were held aloft in the crowd and Martinez described the impact of the supporters, saying: "It's difficult to explain if you were watching on TV, it's easier if you were in the stadium.

"The fans created an incredible atmosphere and gave the home team a goal lead. At that point we were a little shell-shocked, it took us probably 20 minutes to start being ourselves.

"We couldn't get through that desire, that heart and that pressure that the Danish team put on.

"That's expected, in a way. They were playing at home, they needed to win to qualify and I felt that the first half was a lot of emotion involved that took away a lot of what we can do on a football pitch."

Kevin De Bruyne inspired Belgium to a 2-1 comeback win over Denmark that secured their place in the knockout stages of Euro 2020.

With Roberto Martinez's side trailing to an early Yussuf Poulsen goal, De Bruyne came off the bench for the second half, his first outing since injury forced him off during Manchester City's Champions League final defeat to Chelsea.

And the 29-year-old quickly provided a brilliant assist for Thorgan Hazard before turning the game completely on its head with an equally superb finish that secured the points.

Just five days on from those traumatic scenes involving Christian Eriksen in Copenhagen, the home fans welcomed their heroes back to Parken by creating an electric atmosphere.

The consequences of that were apparent just two minutes in as Jason Denayer played a panicky pass out from the back that was easily intercepted by Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg.

The Tottenham midfielder did well to shrug off his man in charging toward goal and poke the ball to Poulsen, who produced a powerful low finish into the bottom corner from just inside the box.

That early strike served to further stir the Danes, who twice went close moments later as Joakim Maehle saw a shot smothered and Martin Braithwaite flicked goalward from a low cross.

Proceedings were paused after 10 minutes for a short period of applause in support of the absent Eriksen, a tribute that served to somewhat dull the hosts' momentum.

But Belgium were relieved to see a Mikkel Damsgaard effort dribble wide of the post after great footwork in the box, once Denmark got going again after the half-hour mark.

The visitors' poor performance prompted a half-time change, the ineffective Dries Mertens making way for De Bruyne.

And the substitute made an almost immediate impact, building on a trademark burst forward from Romelu Lukaku by sitting down two opponents before teeing up Thorgan Hazard to level up from close range.

De Bruyne then went one better, getting on the end of a slick team move to smash a low, left-footed drive home from the edge of the penalty area, in front of the delighted Belgian supporters.

Denmark made a late push to get back on terms, going closest when Braithwaite brushed the bar with a header at the death, but they were ultimately held at arm's length by a team who strengthened their credentials as potential tournament winners.

What does it mean? Belgian looking strong

With six points under their belts, Belgium know that their place in the knockout stage is assured.

Denmark, meanwhile, know that only a win in their final group game could earn them a place in the latter stages of the tournament.

De Bruyne crucial to Belgium hopes

As if a goal and assist weren't proof enough of his importance, De Bruyne also won five of his six duels and made 19 passes in the opposition half during an inspirational second-half cameo.

The Manchester City's man's fitness didn't look in doubt, either, which means he is now surely guaranteed a starting berth in each of Belgium's remaining games in this tournament.

Mertens under pressure

Conversely, it is not a good look for Mertens to be the player who left the field for the matchwinner.

The 34-year-old managed just 18 touches, lost all four of his duels, and had six passes in the opposition half during a forgettable first half - he now faces a battle to get his place back.

What's next?

Belgium head back to St Petersburg to complete their group-stage campaign against Finland on Monday, while Denmark remain in Copenhagen to take on Russia on the same day.

Denmark and Belgium paused play after 10 minutes of their Euro 2020 clash to applaud stricken Christian Eriksen.

The Inter midfielder was given CPR on the pitch during the first half of Denmark's Group B opener with Finland last Saturday after suffering a cardiac arrest.

Eriksen remains in hospital in Copenhagen and assured fans on Tuesday that he is "fine – under the circumstances" as he continues to be monitored.

Denmark were in action on Thursday for the first time since that shocking incident and opponents Belgium wanted to celebrate Eriksen's survival and improved health.

Romelu Lukaku revealed ahead of the match at Parken Stadium that the Red Devils intended to bring the game to a halt after 10 minutes – 10 being Eriksen's shirt number.

Lukaku plays at Inter alongside Eriksen and appeared emotional as the players turned their thoughts towards Eriksen.

 

Both sets of players stopped the game for a minute as they and supporters inside the ground clapped in unison in an emotional tribute.

Denmark held a 1-0 lead at that point in the match thanks to Yussuf Poulsen's goal after just 99 seconds – the second-quickest in European Championship history.

The Danish Football Union announced earlier on Thursday that Eriksen will be fitted with an implant to help regulate his heart rhythm in future.

Specialists recommended he be fitted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), a device that uses electrical pulses to regulate potentially dangerous heart rhythms.

Christian Eriksen is to be fitted with an implant to help to regulate his heart rhythm after suffering cardiac arrest during Denmark's Euro 2020 match with Finland.

The midfielder was given CPR on the pitch during the first half of the match in Copenhagen last week before being taken to hospital, where he is stable.

Denmark goalkeeper Kasper Schmeichel said on Monday that Eriksen was "smiling and laughing", while the Inter player himself thanked fans for their messages of support as he underwent tests.

On Thursday, the Danish Football Association confirmed specialists had recommended he be fitted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), a device that uses electrical pulses to regulate potentially dangerous heart rhythms.

A tweet from the FA's official account said: "National team doctor Morten Boesen has been in contact with the cardiac specialist at Rigshospitalet and Christian Eriksen and this is the latest status.

"After Christian has been through different heart examinations it has been decided that he should have an ICD (heart starter). This device is necessary after a cardiac attack due to rhythm disturbances.

"Christian has accepted the solution and the plan has moreover been confirmed by specialists nationally and internationally who all recommend the same treatment.

"We encourage everybody to give Christian and his family peace and privacy."

Professor Sanjar Sharma, an expert in sports cardiology, explained to Stats Perform the nature of the implant and the discussions Eriksen is likely to have over whether he will be able to continue his career.

"The question is, the aim is, this must never happen again," he said. "To do this, they will probably be considering putting in something called an implantable defibrillator, which is a small device that lives under the collar bone with a lead in the vicinity of the heart. That lead monitors the cardiac rhythm day and night and should the heart go into a very dangerous rhythm called ventricular tachycardia, this lead detects it at the shock box and delivers a shock to restore a normal rhythm. That would be their main goal.

"Of course, their main goal would be to ensure he has another fifty or sixty years, which is what he should have at his age. Clearly, there will be discussions about where he goes from now as far as his career goes. And that will be determined from what they find.

"If they find something that is incurable such as a scar, if you have a lot of scarring, you can't get rid of that, that's there permanently. Or let's say that they don't find anything and his cardiac arrest remains an enigma, something clearly happened, we just haven't been able to identify [it], it may be [it] happened in the spur of the moment, we haven't found what caused it. In that particular situation, it's very unreliable so you would have to tell him, this happened already once and it could happen again. The outcome may not be the same.

"You'll probably find the medical fraternity would now be advising him, I would say probably not to compete. But in the United Kingdom certainly, we really do respect the autonomy of the athlete. The athlete has a massive say in their career. It's not just that the doctor says 'you will not train again or compete again', the athlete gets involved.

"There will be a meeting certainly with the athlete, next of kin, and a club representative, talking about the possible scenarios, and then it may depend also on what Christian feels about his ongoing career, how his wife feels, how he feels about clearly bringing up the two children with this unpredictable risk. Lots of factors will come into this."

Denmark will use some tips from their stricken team-mate Christian Eriksen as they look to thwart Romelu Lukaku in Thursday's Euro 2020 Group B match against Belgium.

Kasper Hjulmand's side are back in action for the first time since the ordeal of witnessing Eriksen's sickening cardiac arrest on the turf at Parken Stadium just before half-time in last Saturday's 1-0 defeat to Finland.

The Inter playmaker thankfully pulled through and is feeling "fine, under the circumstances" as he continues to recuperate in hospital.

But Hjulmand told reporters that Eriksen's insight into his San Siro team-mate Lukaku could prove invaluable.

Lukaku scored twice in Belgium's 3-0 win over Russia, dedicating his opening goal to his close friend Eriksen.

That made him the second Belgium player to score in at least two European Championships after Jan Ceulemans in 1980 and 1984.

"Due to Eriksen's absence, we will have to do things differently, but Belgium will have to be top to beat us." Hjulmand said. "We have to make sure that Lukaku is as uninvolved as possible. 

"Once he's on the ball, he can't be stopped. Eriksen – his team-mate at Inter – also pointed out that danger to us." 

Belgium will be without Timothy Castagne after the wing-back suffered a fractured eye socket against Russia, although Kevin De Bruyne is back in training after a similar injury and Axel Witsel (Achilles) is expected to take a place on the bench.

Aside from Eriksen, all members of Hjulmand's squad trained on Wednesday, although the coach conceded he would check on whether each felt available to play.

"It will undoubtedly be an emotional evening for us, but also for Christian," he added. 

 

PLAYERS TO WATCH

Denmark – Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg

Hojbjerg's tame second-half penalty against Finland was a moment to forget but the Tottenham midfielder will have to be on his game to shut down Belgium's lavishly gifted creative department. He won possession more times than any other Premier League player in 2020-21 (296), while he was second only to Manchester City's Rodri in terms of passes made (2,785).

Belgium – Kevin De Bruyne

If De Bruyne can instantly relocate the form that won him a second consecutive PFA Footballers' Footballer of the Year award then it could spell trouble for Denmark and joy for the prolific Lukaku. In 25 Premier League games this season, De Bruyne delivered 12 assists – an average of one every 167 minutes.

KEY OPTA FACTS

- Denmark and Belgium's only previous meeting at a major tournament was in the group stages of Euro 1984. Denmark won 3-2, having been 2-0 down.
- Indeed, it is best to expect goals when these two come together. The only 0-0 draw between the countries came in their first meeting, back in 1922. They have averaged 3.7 goals per game since.
- Belgium have won four of their past five matches at the European Championship, as many as they had won across their first 13 games in the competition.
- The Red Devils have lost just one of their past 24 matches in all competitions, winning 20.
- Dries Mertens could make his 100th appearance for Belgium. He would join team-mates Jan Vertonghen, Toby Alderweireld, Eden Hazard and Witsel on the century mark.

Christian Eriksen has said he feels "fine – under the circumstances" after medics saved his life when he collapsed during Denmark's Euro 2020 clash with Finland.

Inter midfielder Eriksen was given CPR on the pitch during the first half of Saturday's game in Copenhagen after collapsing with no other players around him.

Denmark team-mate Kasper Schmeichel reported on Monday that Eriksen was "smiling and laughing" in hospital, while team doctor Morten Boesen confirmed the 29-year-old suffered a cardiac arrest.

Boesen said Eriksen "was gone" before being resuscitated on the field.

Now Eriksen has revealed the first picture of him in hospital, giving a thumbs-up gesture.

He wrote in a message posted to the Danish Football Union (DBU) Twitter page: "Hello everyone. Big thanks for your sweet and amazing greetings and messages from all around the world. It means a lot to me and my family.

"I'm fine – under the circumstances. I still have to go through some examinations at the hospital, but I feel okay. Now, I will cheer on the boys on the Denmark team in the next matches.

"Play for all of Denmark. Best, Christian."

The DBU on Monday described Eriksen as being in a "stable and good" condition.

In a statement issued by his agent, also on Monday, former Ajax and Tottenham midfielder Eriksen thanked those who assisted him and vowed to get to the bottom of what caused the cardiac arrest.

Denmark skipper Simon Kjaer has been widely praised for stopping Eriksen from swallowing his tongue and placing his stricken team-mate in the recovery position.

UEFA originally suspended the fixture, but it was agreed the match would resume from where it left off less than two hours later, with Finland winning 1-0.

Denmark's decision to resume their Euro 2020 clash with Finland following Christian Eriksen's cardiac arrest "was the least bad one", according to forward Martin Braithwaite.

Inter midfielder Eriksen was given CPR by medics late on in the first half of Saturday's Group B match after collapsing with no other players around him.

The fixture was suspended while Eriksen received life-saving treatment on the field, but it resumed a little under two hours later after the midfielder was confirmed to be "awake".

Tournament organisers UEFA said it agreed to restart the match "following the request made by players of both teams".

However, Denmark boss Kasper Hjulmand said on Sunday that the game should never have resumed from the 41st minute, with his side going on to lose 1-0 in Copenhagen.

The Danes also had the option of coming back the following day, but Braithwaite believes the decision they made was the best on offer.

"None of the options were good. We took the least bad one," Braithwaite said at a news conference on Monday. 

"There were lots of players who were unable to play. We were in a bad place. We made the least bad decision."

Joel Pohjanpalo scored a famous winner for major tournament debutants Finland from their only attempt of the match, with Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg missing a penalty for Denmark 14 minutes later.

Kasper Schmeichel was also on the field at the time of the horrific incident involving Eriksen and agreed with Braithwaite that Denmark were put in a difficult spot.

"We have been put in a position where, on a personal level, I think we should not have been placed," he told reporters.

"We had two options: either come back the next day [Sunday] at noon or resume the game. 

"Someone higher up than us would have had to tell us that this was not the time to make such a decision, and that we should probably wait until the next day to decide.

"But what happened has happened, and let's hope they learn from it."

In the latest update provided by the Danish Football Union on Monday, Eriksen is said to be in a "stable and good" condition as he continues to be monitored in hospital.

Schmeichel revealed at the same news conference that Eriksen was "smiling and laughing" when he visited his team-mate in hospital on Sunday.

Denmark return to Group B action on Thursday with another home match against Belgium.

Kasper Schmeichel has revealed stricken Denmark team-mate Christian Eriksen is "smiling and laughing" in hospital after being kept alive by the "miracle" work of quick-thinking medics.

Inter midfielder Eriksen was given CPR on the pitch during the first half of Saturday's Euro 2020 clash with Finland in Copenhagen after collapsing with no other players around him.

Denmark's team doctor Morten Boesen confirmed on Sunday that the 29-year-old suffered a cardiac arrest and "was gone" before being resuscitated on the field.

In the latest update provided by the Danish Football Union on Monday, Eriksen is said to be in a "stable and good" condition as he continues to be monitored in hospital.

Eriksen also released a statement on Monday via his agent Martin Schoots, thanking those who assisted him and vowing to get to the bottom of what caused the cardiac arrest.

The former Ajax and Tottenham midfielder now appears to be on the mend, with Schmeichel allowed to visit him in hospital on Sunday.

Speaking at a news conference alongside Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg and Martin Braithwaite on Monday, Schmeichel said he is "grateful" his colleague is still alive.

"It was damn nice to see him smile and laugh and be himself, and just notice that he is there," Schmeichel said.

"Visiting him was a wonderful experience and something that has helped me see that he was okay after lying there.

"We talked about nothing and everything. As long as he is well, that has to be the most important thing. He has experienced something that we have not experienced. 

"He has a completely different experience of the situation. It was great to talk to him, and now we have a lot of work to try to navigate."

Denmark skipper Simon Kjaer has been widely praised for stopping Eriksen from swallowing his tongue and placing his stricken team-mate in the recovery position.

Medics were on the field within seconds and provided the playmaker with life-saving treatment, while Denmark's players formed a ring around their team-mate in an attempt to preserve his privacy.

Opening up on the horrific incident for the first time, Schmeichel added: "It's a violent experience. But he is here today, and I am very grateful for that.

"The only heroes there are the doctors who saved him. We are professional football players, but these people dedicate their lives to saving people. 

"That they could do it under that pressure... I cannot describe how much admiration I have for them. That they could bring him back is a miracle. 

"I even think about how I would have my team-mates react if I was lying there. Then we have some amazing people on this team. A captain and a coach who knows how to act.

"It characterises us as a team and country that we stand together until the very end.

"I knew Christian's wife, children, and parents were there, so at one point I tried to look for them. It is an inhuman situation for them to go through.

"I have chosen to say to myself that this has had a happy ending. It's not the end yet, but it could have been so much worse."

Hojbjerg was also on the field at the time of the incident and was left shaken by the experience of watching his close friend receive CPR.

"I saw Christian lying there and looking towards the field. His eyes were white and I thought it looked very strange," Hojbjerg said.

"I saw Simon Kjaer rush off, and then you start thinking what it is. I walked slowly across. More and more first aiders came over, and I could see Simon waving his arms.

"I stood for a long time with the coaches and talked, and I could see that there are some arms that move with the first aid. That was creepy."

Barcelona forward Braithwaite added: "We were all about to lose a friend and a team-mate. 

"I do not remember exactly what I said in the prayer. But it has strengthened my faith, that's for sure."

UEFA originally suspended the fixture, but it was agreed the match would resume from where it left off less than two hours later, with Finland winning the Group B match 1-0.

Denmark are back in action on Thursday with another home game against Belgium.

Christian Eriksen has thanked those who assisted him after he suffered a cardiac arrest on the pitch against Finland on Saturday and now wants to "understand what happened".

Inter midfielder Eriksen collapsed in the first half of the Euro 2020 match in Copenhagen with no other player around him.

He was given CPR by medics and the fixture was originally suspended, but once Eriksen was confirmed to be "awake" the game resumed just under two hours later, Finland going on to win 1-0.

The Danish Football Union (DBU) provided an update on Sunday, confirming that he had suffered a cardiac arrest but his condition was stable pending further examinations.

Team doctor Morten Boesen detailed how he could initially feel a pulse when he arrived at Eriksen's side, but that "suddenly changed" and meant CPR was necessary.

The medical team and Denmark captain Simon Kjaer were widely praised for their respective roles, with the centre-back quickly placing Eriksen in the recovery position.

And, speaking through his agent to Gazzetta dello Sport, Eriksen relayed a brief message of thanks as he now sets about learning why it happened.

He said: "Thank you, I won't give up. I feel better now, but I want to understand what happened. I want to say thank you all for what you did for me."

Denmark are next due to be in action on Thursday against Belgium.

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