The Cleveland Browns have placed wide receiver Jarvis Landry on injured reserve because of a knee injury.

Landry suffered a sprained medial collateral ligament in the first quarter of the Browns' 31-21 win over the Houston Texans on Sunday.

Having been placed on IR, Landry now must miss at least the next three games before being allowed to return to action.

That rules him out of Sunday's home game with the Chicago Bears and the trips to face the Minnesota Vikings and Los Angeles Chargers.

And, with Odell Beckham still yet to make his 2021 debut as he recovers from a torn anterior cruciate ligament, the Browns suddenly look thin at the receiver position.

There is reportedly a good chance Beckham will be ready to face the Bears, but Landry's absence means there will be more pressure on Donovan Peoples-Jones, Rashard Higgins and rookie Anthony Schwartz to produce for Cleveland.

Landry caught all five of his targets for 71 yards in the Browns' opening loss to the Kansas City Chiefs before hauling in one pass for nine yards against the Texans.

He finished last season with 72 catches for 840 yards and three touchdowns.

The Browns can afford to have faith in Higgins, who in 2020 was third among wide receivers in burn percentage. Higgins won his match-up with a defender on a play where he was targeted 78.4 per cent of the time.

Higgins was also seventh with a big-play percentage of 43.3. Peoples-Jones (42.6 per cent) was ninth in that metric and finished the year third with 17.11 burn yards per target, albeit across the small sample size of 20 targets.

Aaron Jones has got his father's ashes back, and it's all thanks to the late-night dedication of a Green Bay Packers stalwart.

Jones lost a necklace containing the ashes in the course of scoring four touchdowns for the Packers against the Detroit Lions on Monday night.

Although he was saddened to be parted from the necklace, Jones said after the Packers' 35-17 win: "If there was any place to lose it, that's where my dad would've wanted me to lose it, so I know he's smiling."

He was optimistic it would be found and was proven right.

Alvin Jones Sr died in April from complications related to COVID-19, having been an important guiding hand behind his son's football career.

The Packers understood the significance of the necklace and long-serving head athletic trainer Bryan Engel set out shortly before 2am to scour the end zone where Jones believed it had gone missing.

"Our trainer Bryan Engel – 'Flea' – he went out there and he found it," Jones told the Steve Czaban Show on 97.3 The Game.

"It's really small. A lot of times it just sits inside my shirt. A lot of people won't even see it or recognise it."

Engel is in his 25th year on the Packers staff and is responsible for managing the team's medical care, but he went the extra mile this time.

Asked how the necklace could prove so difficult to spot on a football field, Jones said: "I'm not sure, maybe because it's so small, but Flea found it so we're perfect.

"Thank you to him. He was out there at like 1:45am. It shows how much they care about us."

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers labelled criticism levelled at his side for their Week 1 loss as "b******t" after they bounced back with a 35-17 win over the Detroit Lions on Monday.

The Packers were humbled 38-3 by the New Orleans Saints in Week 1 but Rodgers responded by throwing 22 from 27 passes for 255 yards including four touchdown passes against the Lions.

Rodgers was forthright when he spoke to reporters in his post-game news conference, after biting his tongue immediately after the game when speaking to ESPN.

The 37-year-old said it was nice to put in a good performance to "get the trolls off our back", labelling the media attention on his side as an "over-reaction".

"I think people like to say a lot of b******t and it's nice to come back in here after a game like that," Rodgers said.

He added: "I think there's even more now than when I started playing, there's so many over-reactions on a week-to-week basis.

"It's nice to come out and have a good performance and get the trolls off our back for at least a week."

Rodgers, who was the subject of a drawn-out saga about a move away from Green Bay in the off-season, admitted the Packers were "disjointed" in Week 1 but would not getting carried away with one win.

"It's one game. We're 1-1 now. We're 1-0 in the division," Rodgers told ESPN. "So we feel good about things but it's early."

The Packers trailed 17-14 at half-time against the Lions but found their "rhythm" with three second-half touchdowns.

"The rhythm was good," he said. "We got the ball to our playmakers, like this guy [Jones].

"Last week we were really disjointed on offence. The first half went the same way but the second half we came out, got into a better rhythm, got a turnover and put the game away."

The Packers will next take on the San Francisco 49ers, who have started 2-0, on Sunday.

Aaron Jones scored four touchdowns as Aaron Rodgers guided the Green Bay Packers to their first win of the new season with a 35-17 victory over the Detroit Lions in Monday Night Football.

The Packers had gone down 38-3 to the New Orleans Saints in Week 1 but bounced back although the Lions threatened an upset early on. Detroit led 17-14 at half-time, scoring two of the first three touchdowns of the game with quarterback Jared Goff completing 13 of 16 passes for 137 first-half yards.

Rodgers and Jones initiated the response, with the running-back finishing with four TDs, with 17 carries and six receives. Three of Jones' touchdowns came from Rodgers' passes, while Robert Tonyan's third quarter touchdown put them ahead of the first time in the game.

The Packers quarterback completed 22 from 27 passes for 255 yards with four touchdowns for the game, going at 9.4 yards per attendance.

Goff was excellent in the first half, finding Quintez Cephus for an early touchdown, while he delivered a pinpoint pass for TJ Hockenson, to sandwich Jones' first-quarter TD.

After Jones' second touchdown, Austin Seibert's 43-yard kick put the Lions ahead by three at the long break.

Rodgers found Tonyan with a 22-yard strike to put Green Bay in front after a 50-yard play to Davante Adams, while Jones leapt into the Lambeau Field crowd with his third touchdown with seven seconds left before the final change.

In the last quarter, Jones crossed again with one yard to run, before De'Vondre Campbell's interception from Goff's pass put an underline on a good Packers response.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers coach Bruce Arians admitted that the franchise have reached out to veteran cornerback Richard Sherman following an injury to Sean Murphy-Bunting.

Cornerback Murphy-Bunting was placed on injured reserve after dislocating his right elbow in the Bucs' 31-29 win over the Dallas Cowboys in Week 1.

Arians said that Tampa Bay general manager Jason Licht had spoken to 33-year-old Sherman to gauge his interest.

Five-time Pro Bowler Sherman was released by the San Francisco 49ers in February but has legal issues to manage after being arrested in July.

"Jason's reached out. We got to see," Arians said. "He's got other things going on too.

"Just a matter of, 'I coach the ones that we got and let him handle the rest of that.' We'll kick the tires on some other guys too.

"But it's just a matter of, 'No, we'll talk and see, and if it's the right fit, it's the right fit and we'll move on it'."

Arians confirmed no timeframe for Murphy-Bunting's absence but he will miss at least three games on injured reserve.

Sherman only played five games for the 49ers last season due to injury but would add experience to the Bucs secondary.

There isn't much time for patience in the NFL, and the ownership of the Arizona Cardinals would have been forgiven for running out of it after an opportunity to end their postseason drought in 2020 was passed up. 

Year two of the Kliff Kingsbury-Kyler Murray experience was a rollercoaster, with explosive offensive performances and last-gasp Hail Mary plays giving way to an uneven and uninspiring stretch run that raised questions about Kingsbury's ability to get the best out of the 2019 first overall pick, as well as piling pressure on a general manager in Steve Keim who had been given the rare luxury of selecting a first-round quarterback in successive years. 

Two weeks into the 2021 season, the Cardinals have reason to believe the partnership of Air Raid disciple Kingsbury and their diminutive dual-threat quarterback is one that can yield the dominant offensive season many have expected and, in the process, propel them to the playoffs. 

Playing in the hyper-competitive NFC West, which would still be undefeated as a division if not for the Seattle Seahawks' bizarre home collapse against the Tennessee Titans on Sunday, the Cards should not get too far ahead of themselves, particularly with memories of last season's 6-3 start that ultimately proved a false dawn still fresh. 

Sunday's captivating 34-33 triumph over the Minnesota Vikings was far from perfect and owed to Greg Joseph shanking a last-second field goal that would have condemned Arizona to defeat. 

However, it served as a scintillating showcase of what the Cardinals' offense can do when firing on all cylinders and a vindication of the offseason moves made with an eye on elevating Murray, with his diverse skill set perfectly suited to the modern NFL, to another level. 

History-maker Murray

After throwing four touchdown passes and running for another score in the Cardinals' blowout win over the Titans in Week 1, Murray tossed three touchdowns and registered another on the ground against Minnesota. In doing so, he became the first player with at least three passing touchdowns and one rushing touchdown in each of his team's first two games of the season in NFL history. 

He now has 12 career games with both a passing and rushing touchdown, the fourth-most by a quarterback in his first three seasons, behind only Cam Newton (20), Josh Allen (16) and Dak Prescott (13). 

Those new entries into the record books were a product of what defenses have come to expect from Murray, who frustrated the Vikings by making magic happen with his legs on a 15-yard touchdown throw to DeAndre Hopkins and a 77-yard bomb to a wide-open Rondale Moore, and also demonstrated his still underrated ability to stand in the pocket and deliver with unerring accuracy. 

Through two weeks, Murray has produced an accurate, well-thrown ball on 88.7 per cent of his passes, according to Stats Perform data, putting him fourth among quarterbacks to attempt at least 10 passes. For quarterbacks with an air yards per attempt average of at least eight yards, Murray's well-thrown percentage is second only to Jalen Hurts (89.1%). 

Murray's accuracy shone through on a pinpoint completion to Christian Kirk between two defenders on 3rd and 16 in the second quarter. The same receiver was on the end on a perfectly lofted fourth-down pass to set up what proved the game-winning field goal, Murray putting the ball in the ideal spot despite having to deliver off his back foot with two defenders in his face. 

Yet the Cardinals' approach was not simply one where they relied on Murray to pull rabbit after rabbit out of his hat. There was a clear effort from Kingsbury to make Murray's life easier, much of which centred around rookie receiver Moore. 

Moore help

Arizona selected Moore in the second round this year despite doubts over an extremely spotty injury history, and his explosiveness has weaponised the Cardinals' short passing game. Kingsbury has regularly utilised screens and pop passes to Moore - and they will remain staples of Arizona's passing attack in 2021 so long as the former Purdue star continues to maximise their upside, as he has done in the first two weeks. 

Registering a burn, which is when a receiver wins his matchup with a defender on plays where he is targeted, on 69.2% of targets, Moore's average depth of target is just 4.3 yards, the joint-seventh lowest in the NFL. However, he leads the league in burn yards per route with 16.5. 

The Cardinals have managed to get similar efficiency out of receivers with more experience in the offense. Kirk (15) and Hopkins (14.6) are each in the top 15 for wide receivers in burn yards per target and are above the league average of 4.7 for burn yards per route with 7.5 and 5.7 respectively. Ninth in the NFL with an average depth of target of 17.7, Kirk is producing at a level that suggests he could blossom into a premier deep threat in his fourth year. 

The numbers are not as pretty for veteran free-agent addition A.J. Green (8.38 burn yards per target), but a touchdown on a screen pass in the third quarter and a 29-yard completion that saw him get a step on Bashaud Breeland downfield, selling an inside move before drifting back outside, offer hope he could enjoy an unexpected late-career renaissance. 

Imperfect vision

That is not to say there are no concerns, though. Murray's pickable pass percentage of 4.84 is above the league average of 3.44 and each of his interceptions against Minnesota hinted at issues seeing the field. 

His pick-six saw him fail to spot linebacker Nick Vigil lurking underneath as he attempted to find Kirk in the soft spot in the zone, while his second interception was a poor decision on which he tried to force the ball downfield against a two-deep safety look. 

Those valleys are ones Kingsbury can live with, however, when the peaks Murray frequently delivers belie a stature that had plenty questioning whether he could make it at the highest level. Murray will need more than two remarkable showings against defenses each ranked in the bottom 10 in the league in yards per play allowed to make a convincing argument that the Cardinals are ready to contend and he is worthy of MVP consideration. 

Still, the evidence to this point has been pretty compelling. The Cardinals' offense boasts the explosive element that was present in the first half of last season but, with the addition of Moore and to a lesser extent Green, has also grown more diverse.

The menu of options available to Murray has expanded and while tougher tests lie in wait, the early signs are that Arizona's burgeoning offensive arsenal can finally satisfy the appetite for playoff football.

Minnesota Vikings head coach Mike Zimmer felt Greg Joseph's missed field goal in their 34-33 loss to the Arizona Cardinals should have been an "easy one".

The Vikings dropped to 0-2 in heartbreaking fashion as Joseph sent a potential game-winning kick wide of the right upright from 37 yards at the end of a captivating see-saw encounter at State Farm Stadium.

Joseph also missed an extra point in a one-point defeat and Zimmer did not hold back in airing his thoughts on his kicker.

"I felt good about that kick," said Zimmer. "I knew he had missed the extra point earlier, but he has been kicking good, we are indoors, perfect surface.

"I am thinking this should be an easy one here. He just has to continue to be more consistent."

Asked in his post-game media conference if he was willing to stick with Joseph, Zimmer replied: "I don't think you should make a decision today on things like that."

The Cardinals are 2-0 following another spectacular showing from Kyler Murray, who threw for 400 yards and three touchdowns while adding a further score on the ground.

Having tossed four touchdown passes and scored on the ground in Week 1, Murray became the first player with at least three passing touchdowns and one rushing touchdown in each of his team's first two games of a season in NFL history.

He also has 12 career games with both a passing and a rushing touchdown, the fourth-most by a quarterback in his first three seasons behind Cam Newton (20), Josh Allen (16) and Dak Prescott (13).

Yet Murray was also intercepted twice, with one of those picks returned for a touchdown, and head coach Kliff Kingsbury accepted the Cardinals were fortunate to prevail.

"I've got to tip my hat to Minnesota," Kingsbury said. "We knew we would get their best shot and they were awesome. Offensively, defensively, I thought they played their tails off and we just got fortunate at the end.

"We lost the turnover margin, throw one pick going in, throw a pick-six and then rough the punter on a fourth down that extends the drive and still find a way to win, that's hard to do in this league.

"I was proud of their fight. We have a lot we've got to clean up; it wasn't nearly good enough. But they fought hard."

The San Francisco 49ers are 2-0 after a win over the Philadelphia Eagles defined by resilience and a desire not to fold with their backs against the wall.

San Francisco's defense found itself very much against the wall with just under six minutes remaining in the second quarter after Jalen Hurts' 91-yard completion to Quez Watkins put the Eagles inside the red zone with a chance to extend their lead to 10-0.

However, the Niners stopped the Eagles four times from inside the five-yard line to force a turnover on downs, with quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo subsequently leading a 12-play, 97-yard drive that finished with a touchdown to Jauan Jennings to give San Francisco the half-time advantage.

That proved the turning point in a hard-fought 17-11 win for the Niners, who controlled the game thereafter and held the Eagles out of the endzone until a late Hurts touchdown and a successful two-point conversion gave Philadelphia a glimmer of hope.

Defensive tackle Javon Kinlaw, who blocked a field goal on his return from a knee injury, said afterwards: "I think they folded before we did. And I didn't think we were going to fold at all."

Garoppolo and the offense finally got things going after three successive three-and-outs to start the game, the first time that has happened with Kyle Shanahan as head coach.

Despite their early struggles, there was never any panic on the San Francisco sideline, the 49ers rewarded for their composure as they won back-to-back games on the east coast for the second successive year having again stayed at The Greenbrier in West Virginia to adapt to the change in time zone.

"Honestly, it was calmer than I expected," said Garoppolo. "Guys weren't freaking out, it was a tough defense, we knew that going into the game it was going to be a grinder type of game, away game coming off the week in West Virginia, there was a lot of things going against us but guys stayed the course and that's what you want to see with guys.

"We're a resilient group and when we play together like that's when we're playing good.

"When you can win different ways like that it makes for a good team. I've been around this league for a while now, teams that can win in different ways whether it's offense, defense, special teams stepping up that makes for a good team."

Reinforcements may be needed on offense at the running back spot, with three players at that position suffering injuries. Elijah Mitchell was able to return from a shoulder injury that the Niners hope is just a stinger, but the severity of JaMycal Hasty's ankle problem is not yet known while Trey Sermon suffered a head injury on debut.

"He said he was good enough to come back in, so that's when you think it's a stinger, but until you have time to go and get an MRI and stuff like that, you never know," Shanahan said of Mitchell.

"But we're hoping it was just a stinger. You usually feel good about it the way he was talking and the way he was able to come back in the game."

Having already lost Raheem Mostert for the season, the Niners will hope to have at least one of their top three backs ready when they host the Green Bay Packers on Sunday and attempt to move to 3-0.

Derrick Henry believes the Tennessee Titans pulled off a victory no one expected as they produced a stirring comeback to beat the Seattle Seahawks on the road.

The Titans had suffered a demoralising 38-13 defeat to the Arizona Cardinals in Week 1 heading into their trip to Seattle.

Their 2021 season looked poised to go from bad to worse when the Seahawks led 30-16 on Sunday, as the Titans tried to cope with offensive line injuries to Taylor Lewan and Rodger Saffold.

But Mike Vrabel's team were not to be denied as they recovered to earn an impressive 33-30 victory in overtime.

Titans running back Henry racked up 182 yards and three touchdowns from 35 carries as well as adding six catches for 55 yards.

Julio Jones, meanwhile, recovered from a difficult Titans debut which led to his connection with quarterback Ryan Tannehill being questioned by making six catches for 128 yards.

"Last week, we didn't play to our standards, and that was on us," Henry, the 2020 Offensive Player of the Year, said after the game.

"I don't think anybody expected us to come out here and get a W. 

"I don't get caught up in all the scenarios and records but we stuck together and I'm glad we came out here and got a win.

"I knew if we stuck together, trust in what we preach and what coach preaches, play the way we practice, it would eventually come together for us."

Henry became just the fourth player in NFL history to reach 10 career games with at least 150 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns, after Hall of Famers Jim Brown, Ladainian Tomlinson and Barry Sanders.

Vrabel was understandably delighted by Henry's performance and the spirit shown by the Titans, who now have momentum at 1-1 going into a key Week 3 meeting with AFC South rivals the Indianapolis Colts.

"It [the impact of Henry] just never ceases to amaze me," Vrabel said.

"We have just got to keep being in opportunities and being in football games where he can help us affect the outcome. That's really what happened.

"I found out that they [the team] are willing to compete, willing to battle and fight.

"I was proud of them, I felt like that was our identity. You have to stop talking about your identity and hoping and wishing about an identity, you have to go out there and play to it and find out what it is.

"I think that [performance] was certainly who we are. These guys are excited, and they should be. All the credit to the players."

For Jones, acquired in a trade from the Atlanta Falcons in the offseason, it was his 59th career game with at least 100 receiving yards, an accomplishment that saw him tie Marvin Harrison for the third-most such games in NFL history. 

The seven-time Pro Bowler now only trails NFL greats Jerry Rice (76 games) and Randy Moss (64) in that category. 

Jones also became the fastest player in history to reach 13,000 receiving yards, doing so in 137 games to smash the previous record held by Rice (154).

Indianapolis Colts quarterback Carson Wentz will undergo further evaluation on an ankle injury he suffered in Sunday's home loss to the Los Angeles Rams.

The Colts fell to 0-2 for the 2021 season after a narrow 27-24 loss to the undefeated Rams.

Wentz arrived at the Colts in a trade with the Philadelphia Eagles and had a disrupted offseason due to a foot injury that required surgery.

And a frustrating start continued as backup Jacob Eason ended up finishing the game for the Colts after Wentz went down, twisting his ankle when he was tackled by Aaron Donald in the fourth quarter.

"He rolled it up pretty bad," said Colts coach Frank Reich, per ESPN. "I had a sense when he walked off the field. It didn't look good. 

"Sometimes if you go back in right away when it's still warm you can maybe gut out a few more plays. 

"The longer we were off the field, it stiffened up and he tried, but there was no chance."

Indianapolis are on the road against AFC South rivals the Tennessee Titans in Week 3, looking to avoid their first 0-3 start since 2011.

Eason is expected to step in for Wentz – who completed 20 of his 31 passes for 247 yards, one touchdown and one interception against the Rams – if the starter is not fit to play.

"Felt it right away," explained Wentz, already sacked six times this season, after the game.

"I tried to tape it up and do everything I could to finish the game. I've sprained my ankle probably 100 times since I was a kid. This one I just couldn't play on it.

"There was not enough stability to get out there and go. It was definitely not fun to watch the last two-minute drives."

As well as the Titans, there are testing road games against the Miami Dolphins and Baltimore Ravens to come in a pivotal stretch for the Colts.

One positive from the Rams loss for the Colts was the play of second-year wide receiver Michael Pittman, who caught eight of his 12 targets for 123 yards, with five of those catches going for first downs.

But Cooper Kupp was the difference maker for the Rams, with nine catches for 163 yards giving him back-to-back 100-yard games.

Patrick Mahomes acknowledged he threw a "dumb" interception in the Kansas City Chiefs' 36-35 loss to the Baltimore Ravens on Sunday.

With just over two minutes to play in the third quarter, Tavon Young picked off Mahomes' pass to Travis Kelce – the first interception the Chiefs quarterback has thrown in September in his NFL career. 

Lamar Jackson, who starred for the Ravens by passing for 239 yards and running for 107, charged over for a two-yard touchdown, and then ran it in again from one yard out the next time Baltimore had the ball to give the Ravens the lead. 

Quarterback Jackson became the first player ever to record five games with at least 200 passing and 100 rushing yards as he also celebrated his first career win over Mahomes at the fourth attempt.

Reflecting on the interception, Mahomes told a news conference: "We were executing, they made a play and you lose games when teams make plays like that.

"I should have just thrown to D-Rob [Demarcus Robinson] in the flat. I thought I could get my leg down. He kind of spun me and it’s just a dumb interception, probably one of the worst interceptions I've ever had.

"The interception was not only dumb in the sense that it was a bad throw, not even close to the receiver, but it was dumb at that point of the game.

"Even if I throw to the flat, he doesn't get the first down, we could get a field or punt to try and pin them back, so there's just a lot of things like this in games that form to get losses in the end."

Another error cost the Chiefs late on. Clyde Edwards-Helaire made his first fumble to allow Ravens rookie Odafe Oweh to strip possession with 1:20 on the clock, allowing Jackson to seal the win.

"We'll need him the entire season. Don’t let one play define you," was Mahomes' message to Edwards-Helaire.

"It's a long season, obviously we lost, it's a good football team that we played at their place, but it's a long season – and if we want to be great, if we want to have a chance to make another run, he's going to be an important part of it."

Coach Andy Reid warned the Chiefs must learn from their mistakes.

"Turnovers, they kill you in this league," Reid told reporters.

"We had two of them down the stretch in crucial times. We have to do better, we have to learn from that. Guys played hard, it's just the other group took advantage of the turnovers."

Lamar Jackson was not pleased with the way the Baltimore Ravens' game against the Kansas City Chiefs began. 

Two of the Ravens' first three possessions Sunday ended with Jackson being picked off by Chiefs safety Tyrann Mathieu, who returned the first of those interceptions 34 yards for a touchdown. 

But Jackson's team-mates encouraged him to keep playing his game, and he turned in a vintage performance to lead Baltimore to a 36-35 victory – his first win in four encounters with Patrick Mahomes and the Chiefs. 

"I know my team is going to look at me. If I'm out there just messing up, they're going to be like, 'Damn, what are you doing?'" Jackson told reporters. "So, I've got to do it for my guys.

"My guys have my back. The first two interceptions, they were like, 'Man, you're good; you got that out the way. Let's just play.' I was like, 'You're right, I've got to play now. That's over with.' And that's what we did."

Jackson was at his dual-threat best after those early wobbles, passing for 239 yards and a touchdown and rushing for a game-high 107 yards and two more TDs. 

Those last two scores came in the fourth quarter as the Ravens completed their comeback against the reigning AFC champions, but there was one last key play Jackson had to make. 

Mahomes had the Chiefs moving downfield in search of a game-winning field goal when Ravens rookie Odafe Oweh stripped Clyde Edwards-Helaire and recovered the fumble with 1:20 remaining.

Fifteen seconds later, after Kansas City had used all three of their timeouts, Baltimore coach John Harbaugh faced a decision on fourth-and-one from the Ravens 43-yard line. 

He fully intended to go for the first down, but he thought he would ask Jackson's opinion on what they should do.

The quarterback's response was a simple "Hell, yeah," and the Ravens of course put the ball in his hands. He gained two yards to convert and the game was over. 

Asked about making that call, Harbaugh made it clear there was no hesitation. 

"It says that I have complete confidence in Lamar Jackson to make every play," he said. "I'll just never, ever, not have faith in him to make a play in any situation.

"I'm happy for him. We love each other. All of us have each other's backs."

It was a welcome recovery for the Ravens after a difficult season-opening loss at the Las Vegas Raiders last week and now they can move forward with a bit more confidence after a long-awaited defeat of the Chiefs. 

"It feels good to get that monkey off our back," Jackson said. "It just feels good. But we've gotta move on to Detroit now. We didn't win the Super Bowl yet. It's just one game. We just gotta keep staying focused."

Lamar Jackson put his all-around game on display once again, making NFL history as he led the Baltimore Ravens to a 36-35 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs. 

Jackson passed for 239 yards and ran for 107, becoming the first player ever to record four games with at least 200 passing and 100 rushing yards as the Ravens rebounded from a tough season-opening loss at the Las Vegas Raiders to defeat Patrick Mahomes and the reigning AFC champions. 

It was Jackson's first career win over fellow quarterback Mahomes, having lost the three previous head-to-head meetings in the NFL.

Sunday's game got off to a wild start as Tyrann Mathieu picked off Jackson on the third play of the game and returned it 34 yards for a touchdown, only to have the Ravens answer on their next possession with a bizarre sequence that saw Ty'Son Williams fumble at the one-yard line but team-mate Devin Duvernay picked it up and took it in for a score. 

That set the tone for a high-scoring affair in which Mahomes completed touchdown passes of 33, 40 and 46 yards, the last of which saw his favourite target Travis Kelce elude much of the vaunted Baltimore defence on the way to the end zone. 

That score put the Chiefs up 35-24 but Baltimore star Jackson led the Ravens right back with a boost from the defence. 

With just over two minutes to play in the third period, Tavon Young picked off Mahomes' pass to Kelce – the first interception the Chiefs quarterback has thrown in September in his NFL career. 

Jackson would cap the ensuing drive by running for a two-yard touchdown, and run it in again from one yard out the next time Baltimore had the ball to give the Ravens the lead. 

Mahomes got the Chiefs moving immediately, looking for the game-winning field goal, but Ravens rookie Odafe Oweh stripped Clyde Edwards-Helaire and recovered the fumble with 1:20 remaining. 

Kansas City used up all three of their remaining timeouts on the next possession, but Jackson sealed the win with a two-yard run on fourth-and-one. 

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers saw plenty of room for improvement even after a 48-25 defeat of the Atlanta Falcons that featured five touchdown passes by superstar Tom Brady. 

NFL Super Bowl champions the Buccaneers held a 28-10 lead following the opening drive of the second half, but watched Matt Ryan and the Falcons narrow the deficit to three by the end of the third quarter on Sunday.

Brady's final TD pass of the game and a pair of interception returns for touchdowns by Mike Edwards in the fourth period accounted for the lopsided final score, but the Buccaneers did not sound satisfied afterward. 

"The defence made some huge plays, that's the great thing," Brady told reporters. "Fourth quarter, three-point game and they make a huge stop and [we] went down there and scored, which was good. Then a few big turnovers, so that was great to see.

"Offensively, we grinded out and found a way but obviously we all wish we could have done some things to be more productive. It was a good team effort."

Brady improved to 9-0 in his career against the Falcons and broke one of his own NFL records in the process. 

The 44-year-old has already thrown nine touchdowns through two games this season – a new career-high after two games of a season.

Brady has thrown for at least four passing touchdowns in four successive regular-season games, dating back to last term. It ties Hall of Famer Dan Marino for the NFL's second longest streak since 1950 – one shy of Peyton Manning's streak of five straight games.

Including the playoffs, Sunday was the ninth straight game in which the Buccaneers won while scoring at least 30 points, breaking the league record of eight previously shared with Brady's 2007 and 2011 New England Patriots. 

On the heels of a tense 31-29 victory over the Dallas Cowboys in the season opener, Tampa Bay are grateful to be unbeaten but do not believe they have found a rhythm. 

"We left points out there," Bucs head coach Bruce Arians said. "Obviously we got 14 out of the defence but we left points out there offensively.

"I haven't seen us getting close to playing consistently yet. Hopefully we'll get there next week because we're going to have to."

The Buccaneers will face the high-powered Los Angeles Rams in Week 3 in their first road game of the season, and Brady agrees that the offence will need to do more going forward. 

"What I think and I'm sure other guys feel the same way is I think we can do better," Brady said. "I really do. I think we have the opportunity, the way the games are flowing and the opportunities we're getting with the ball we can maybe have even more opportunities.

"We were a little loose with the ball, some penalties at different times that have knocked us out of some scoring drives. Some missed throws that I've had, some missed reads. I certainly wish I had made a few better throws tonight.

"But, again, it's good to get the win. We're 2-0 and there's a lot to build on."

Dak Prescott praised the resilience of the Dallas Cowboys after the overcame the Los Angeles Chargers 20-17 in the NFL on Sunday.

Staring down the possibility of a second consecutive heart-breaking road defeat to start the season, the Cowboys showed their determination in Week 2.

That was the message from star quarterback Prescott after Greg Zuerlein's 56-yard field as time expired gave the Cowboys victory over the Chargers. 

After watching Tom Brady march Super Bowl champions the Tampa Bay Buccaneers down the field in the final minute to set up a game-winning kick in the season opener, the Cowboys' defence got the job done in the second half against the Chargers.

An 11-play Chargers drive in the third quarter ended with a Damontae Kazee interception of Justin Herbert in the end zone, four plays after an apparent Herbert TD pass was called back due to a holding penalty. 

It was more of the same on a 12-play Los Angeles drive that consumed much of the fourth quarter, as Herbert and the Chargers reached the Dallas two-yard line before having a touchdown negated due to an illegal shift.

Two plays later, Micah Parsons sacked Herbert for an 18-yard loss and the home side had to settle for a game-tying field goal from Tristan Vizcaino rather than a go-ahead touchdown. 

To Prescott, those two stands were indicative of a team determined to stick together. 

"We're resilient, we're gonna fight, we're always in the fight," Prescott told CBS. "I think tonight we showed our brotherhood, we trusted each other, we played complementary football.

"Defence came up with a great turnover there in the red zone and we finished off with a win."

Zuerlein saw to that with his booming 56-yarder, which Prescott "had all faith" the veteran kicker would make. 

More important over the course of the game was a revived Dallas rushing attack after the team ran just 18 times for 60 yards at Tampa Bay. 

The Cowboys more than tripled that yardage total on Sunday, going for 198 on 31 carries as Tony Pollard ran for 109 yards while averaging 8.4 per rush and Ezekiel Elliott piled up 71 yards, with both backs finding the end zone. 

"It started with the offensive line," Prescott said. "They came out and they set the tone, they were physical. That allowed both of those backs to get going. Those guys hit the holes and just allowed us to be balanced.

"That's what we said, after last game -- we're gonna do whatever it takes to win, whether it's throwing a lot, run and a lot or be balanced. Tonight, it took all of that to get it done."

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