Carlos Sainz is optimistic his first Ferrari win could be just around the corner after pushing Max Verstappen close to the limit in the Canadian Grand Prix.

Defending Formula One drivers' champion Verstappen defended expertly to keep Sainz at bay over the closing laps in Montreal, sealing a sixth win of his season and extending his championship lead to 46 points.

Red Bull team-mate Sergio Perez, who abandoned Sunday's race in its early stages, sits second, while Sainz is fifth but producing strong results every time he finishes.

The Spaniard has had three DNFs, twice crashing out, but he has had five podiums and a fourth place in the other six races to date.

For the 27-year-old, however, the wait for a first Formula One race victory goes on.

Formerly of Toro Rosso, Renault and McLaren, he has been a staple of the top 10 in recent seasons, without yet scaling the top step.

He said of Sunday's race: "I was pushing flat out. I wasn't leaving any inch to the walls. I was pushing everything with the battery.

"I tried everything to pass Max, but today we just didn't have enough pace to get close enough in the hairpin to then get him a bit out of line into the chicane.

"But the positive thing is we were quicker, we were faster all race, we just [needed] that little bit more to overtake around here.

"I'm particularly happy with the race pace, with the way we managed to put pressure on Max during the whole race, and the timing of the pit stops I think was right."

Team-mate Charles Leclerc, third in the championship, has won twice already this season. He surged from a back-row start to earn fifth place in Canada.

Silverstone and the British Grand Prix is next on the calendar, with Sainz seeing grounds for Ferrari optimism.

He said: "Honestly, we tried everything, and we were very, very close to winning today, so I take the positives and keep trying in the next one."

Red Bull team principal Christian Horner has hailed Max Verstappen for being in the "form of his life" after he extended his lead at the top of the drivers' championship.

Verstappen started on pole at the Canadian Grand Prix and ultimately held off Carlos Sainz to claim his sixth win of the season and mark Red Bull's best start to a Formula One season.

Sainz remained within DRS range for the final 10 laps of the race but was unable to make the move stick, with Verstappen holding firm.

Red Bull have now won seven of the nine races so far this season to put themselves 76 points ahead of Ferrari in the constructor's championship.

In the drivers' standings, the win gives Verstappen a 46-point lead over team-mate Sergio Perez, whose race ended prematurely, and Horner believes the reigning world champion is showing the best level of performance so far in his career.

"It wasn't very comfortable at all in those last 10 laps or so because Max just couldn't break the DRS and the Ferrari was very quick in the straight line today," Horner told Sky Sports.

"They could attack the kerbs and stay close but there wasn't a single mistake. We lost communication with the car, it was only one-way traffic where he could hear us but we couldn't hear him.

"All credit to Carlos today, he pushed him really hard. The strategy wasn't clear because we went for that early stop, we felt that was the best route to the end of the race, and then Sainz got a free stop too which set it up nicely for the end of the race. It was super tight.

"We've just got to take each race at time. We've put a great run together and it's great to be heading to Silverstone leading both championships. Max is in the form of his life and doing a great job."

Despite the late surge from Sainz putting Verstappen under pressure, the Dutchman felt it was a "fun" finale.

"It was really exciting at the end – I was giving it everything I had and, of course, Carlos was doing the same," he said.

"I could see he was pushing and charging, but when you're on the DRS it's a lot easier to charge. The last few laps were a lot of fun.

"Luckily, this year, we seem really quick on the straights so that helps a lot."

Lewis Hamilton returned to the podium at the Canadian Grand Prix and sees potential in his car as Mercedes battle issues with their W13 model.

Seven-time world champion Hamilton had not finished on the podium since the season-opener in Bahrain, but secured third place in Montreal behind Max Verstappen and Carlos Sainz.

The Briton's struggles have largely been down to his Mercedes W13 car porpoising – otherwise known as bouncing unevenly.

Hamilton faced such difficulties at the Azerbaijan Grand Prix, struggling with back problems after a painful ride in Baku that led to doubts over him featuring in the next race.

However, the 37-year-old subsequently confirmed he would compete and spoke gleefully after securing his second podium in nine attempts.

"It's quite overwhelming to get this third place – it's been such a battle this year with the car, but we continue to stay vigilant, focused and never giving up, and that's something I'm proud of," Hamilton said.

"We're getting closer, so we've got to keep pushing and keep pushing, and hopefully we'll eventually be in the fight with these guys."

Hamilton, speaking to Sky Sports after the race, thanked the team working on the car as he reflected on an emotional season.

"I want to say a big shout to the team back home, they are working so hard at the factory week in week out. It’s difficult working and not seeing any progress," he added to Sky Sports.

"It's been a difficult year for me personally and in the car. Qualifying was emotional for me and back in the garage we were like 'wow, this is beautiful for us', we have been working so hard.

"Then to have a strong race just gives me so much hope and confidence that we can move forwards.

"There is potential in this car, it's not currently where we want it to be, it's just got a really small working window and if you don't get it perfect it's all over the place.

"That's a really hard thing to navigate through, but the team did a great job this weekend."

Hamilton's fellow Mercedes team-mate George Russell maintained his run of finishing in the top five in every race this season, settling for fourth.

That saw Mercedes move to 188 points in the constructor standings, 116 behind leaders Red Bull, and Toto Wolff acknowledged his team still have much to work on.

"They were both very good and they were on different set-ups and different rear wing settings. We showed some pace today," Wolff said.

"Before the safety car came out at the end we were actually quicker than Sainz. You're picking out a few laps and saying, 'yeah we are back' but I don't think that's the case yet, we just need to keep on working.

"The way forward, we just need to develop the car in a different window than we had. We were having it really low on the ground and clearly that doesn't function. 

"I think before we start looking to fix the problems, you need to understand where the issues are.

"I think we have development direction. We haven't got it right in many areas but we own the problem and we will fix it." 

While Russell secured yet another top-five finish, he warned that the issues with cars porpoising is far from over.

"I had total confidence we were able to carve our way past the Haas and Alpines," he said. 

"We were certainly concerned [Charles] Leclerc and Checo [Sergio Perez] would be able to come through and be fortunate to keep them behind us.

"Ultimately, our race pace was closer to Ferrari and Red Bull than we've seen all season, but the inherent performance isn't there yet.

"It was a shame I couldn't get the tyres going at the end, probably would have liked to pit before the first safety car, and then have been in the fight at the end.

"Nevertheless, P4, it's good points for the team and great to be back on the podium for the team.

"It was definitely bumpy out there, down the straight the car was just hitting the ground. It'll be a good sleep again tonight for sure.

"I think there are so many different factors [with the porpoising], this global issue with the 2022 cars is far from over."

Max Verstappen showed dogged resistance to secure victory in the Canadian Grand Prix after holding off Carlos Sainz, as Lewis Hamilton returned to the podium.

After the ninth leg of the 22-race season, Verstappen's lead in the Formula One drivers' championship stands at 46 points, and that is because his Red Bull team-mate and closest rival in the championship Sergio Perez was an early casualty in Montreal.

Sainz, in the Ferrari, clung tight behind Verstappen over the closing laps after a lengthy safety car delay but could not quite forge an overtaking opportunity.

That meant Verstappen's 150th grand prix was a triumphant one, as Sainz was kept waiting for his first F1 victory.

Hamilton had not finished on the podium since the season-opening race in Bahrain, a wait of seven races, so the Briton was delighted to get third, ahead of Mercedes team-mate George Russell. Hamilton said it was "quite overwhelming".

Perez, who crashed out in Q2 on Saturday, pulled over to the side of the track and abandoned the race on lap nine, seeming to lose power and complaining of being stuck in gear.

It was clear that Fernando Alonso, in the Alpine, would not be able to convert second place on the grid into a top-three finish as the two-time champion gradually drifted down the field.

Alonso did not pit until lap 29 and came back out on hard tyres in seventh place, behind team-mate Esteban Ocon and Ferrari's Charles Leclerc.

Leclerc first went to the pits on the 42nd lap, but it was a painfully sluggish stop and left the man from Monte Carlo down in 12th place. It was a credit to him and his team that he was able to surge through the field and close in to just three points behind Perez in the championship.

Yuki Tsunoda crashed out on lap 49 and that forced the drivers to proceed behind the safety car for five laps, drawing the field tightly together.

Leclerc, who started on the back row of the grid after his car was fitted with an all-new power unit, jumped ahead of the Alpines of Alonso and Ocon to go fifth, while at the front, Verstappen fittingly showed the defence of a champion to fend off Sainz.

Hubert Hurkacz revelled in defeating the "the best player in the world" after downing Daniil Medvedev in straight sets to lift the Halle Open title.

Medvedev replaced Novak Djokovic as the world number one last Monday, just a day after the Russian fell to a surprise final defeat against Tim van Rijthoven at the Rosmalen Grass Court Championships.

The 26-year-old followed that up with another final appearance in Halle, where he was convincingly beaten 6-1 6-4 by world number 12 Hurkacz.

That made Hurkacz the seventh male player in the Open Era to win his first five career finals, while Medvedev has lost all three showpieces he has contested in 2022.

The US Open success in September was the last trophy Medvedev lifted, but Hurkacz lavished praise on his opponent after the match on Sunday.

"Daniil is an unbelievable player," said Hurkacz. "He's the best player in the world, so it's very tricky to play him.

"All the right shots went my way at the beginning, so I definitely gained a lot of momentum from that. 

"I'm super excited. I've been waiting a little for my first [title] this year. I'm happy to win my first ATP 500 title and of course, on the grass it is very special.

"I was serving pretty good today and got a bit of momentum from the first game.

"I saved a couple of deuces on my service game, and then I managed to break Daniil’s serve so I definitely got a bit of momentum. I'm very happy with the win in front of such a great crowd here."

Medvedev boasted a 14-2 record on grass since a first-round exit at Halle last year before meeting Hurkacz, who came in for praise from the world number one.

"Congrats Hubert, great match today, great week. Congrats to you and your team," he said at the post-match ceremony.

"You guys are super nice. Hopefully a lot more matches to play on the biggest stage. Congrats for a great week and the title."

Medvedev was frustrated throughout the match, repeatedly shouting at coach Gilles Cervara, who stormed out of his seat early in the second set.

While he did not address the topic after the final, Medvedev apologised to the crowd for "not making this match longer and more interesting" and acknowledged he was "not easy to be with on the court" this week.

Former US Open champion Sloane Stephens suffered a shock first-round loss to world number 217 Katie Swan on day one of the Bad Homburg Open.

British player Swan, who will be competing on a wildcard at Wimbledon, scored a 2-6 6-4 6-2 victory over her American opponent.

Although Stephens has not been regularly hitting the heights of her 2017 Flushing Meadows triumph in recent seasons, the world number 48 would have fancied getting past Swan on Sunday.

The 23-year-old Swan needed a wildcard just to get into qualifying for this event in Germany, and she is due to play doubles alongside Stephens on Monday.

The match began well enough for Stephens, but Swan began to relish the matchup and levelled the contest before dominating the deciding set. Swan let three match points slip by, serving two double faults as the tension got to her, but the win was secured when Stephens drilled a forehand into the net.

Speaking in an on-court interview, Swan said: "It feels great. Sloane is an amazing player. She's a grand slam champion, and you can't get much better than that.

"We're actually playing doubles together tomorrow, so hopefully that'll be fun. I'm so happy to come through that one. It's my first tournament on grass not in England, so it's been fun so far, and it's probably my best result."

Other winners on Sunday in Bad Homburg included Caroline Garcia and Kamilla Rakhimova, who upset eighth seed Liudmila Samsonova.

At the Eastbourne International, where Serena Williams is due to make her tennis comeback by playing doubles in the coming days, first-round winners on Sunday included Marta Kostyuk, Kaia Kanepi and Sara Sorribes Tormo.

Poland's Magdalena Frech enjoyed a 6-3 6-0 stroll against Zheng Qinwen, the 19-year-old Chinese player who beat Simona Halep before causing Iga Swiatek plenty of problems at the recent French Open.

Andre Burakovsky's status for Monday's Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Finals is uncertain after the Colorado Avalanche forward suffered an injury in Saturday's 7-0 rout of the Tampa Bay Lightning. 

Avalanche coach Jared Bednar said Burakovsky is being evaluated and will not travel with the team to Tampa but is expected to join the club in Florida on Monday. 

Burakovsky was injured in Game 2 after being hit on the hand by a Victor Hedman shot early in the second period. 

Before exiting, Burakovsky assisted on Colorado's first goal and scored one of his own just under 11 minutes later to help the Avs take an early 3-0 lead. He also scored the overtime winner in Game 1. 

This is the second time Burakovsky has been injured in the playoffs after he missed Games 2 and 3 of the Western Conference final against the Edmonton Oilers with a leg injury sustained while blocking a shot in the series opener. 

After setting career highs with 22 goals and 39 assists during the regular season, Burakovsky has been playing on Colorado's second line in place of Nazem Kadri, who injured his right thumb in Game 3 of the Oilers series.

Kadri has not played since after undergoing surgery, but is travelling with the team and is considered day to day, according to Bednar. 

"We're hopeful we'll see him at some point," Bednar said. "But I'm not sure about Game 3 or Game 4." 

After winning Games 1 and 2 on home ice, Colorado are two victories away from securing their first Stanley Cup since 2001. 

Oleksandr Usyk and Anthony Joshua's rematch has been confirmed for August in Saudi Arabia, with three heavyweight titles on the line.

The bout in Saudi Arabia, which will take place on August 20, comes 11 months after Ukrainian Usyk defeated Joshua at the Tottenham Hotspur Stadium in north London to secure the WBA, WBC and IBF heavyweight titles.

Joshua possessed a rematch clause in his contract but there were initially some question marks as to whether he would activate his option or step aside to allow Usyk to face off against Tyson Fury in a heavyweight unification bout.

Further delays then occurred following Russia's invasion of Ukraine, with Usyk returning to Kyiv to help defend his nation's capital.

Dubbed the 'Rage on the Red Sea', Joshua's bout with Usyk in Jeddah comes almost three years since he reclaimed his heavyweight belts with victory against Andy Ruiz Jr, who had inflicted a first career defeat upon the Briton.

Joshua's record now stands at 24-2 with 22 knockouts, while Usyk took his record to 19-0 with 13 knockouts with victory against the Brit.

The bout will be Joshua's 12th-consecutive heavyweight title fight and he lay down the gauntlet ahead of the August clash.

"What a roller coaster journey, fighting for the heavyweight championship of the world for the 12th consecutive time," he said.

"I won the belt, unified the division won another belt, lost the belts, became two-time unified heavyweight champion and now have my date with history set to become three-time Unified heavyweight champion of the world. What an opportunity.

"Fighting championship level back to back has had its pros and cons, but I decide every day to get stronger, to learn from my experiences and grow. A happy fighter is a dangerous fighter and I am the happiest and most motivated I have been."

Usyk's camp referenced the ongoing struggles in Ukraine following the announcement, with promoter Alexander Krassyuk saying: "The rematch is on the way. The fight will be much bigger and more spectacular than the first. It is new history in the making. 

"Being a part of this event is a huge honour. Our country is now fighting for its heritage. Our mission is to expand its legacy. With the help of the Lord we will achieve this."

A French-inspired Barbarians drubbed England with a seven-try showing at Twickenham to win 52-21 despite the dismissal of Will Skelton.

La Rochelle lock Skelton was sent off in the 37th minute after connecting with the head of Patrick Schickerling but the invitational side nevertheless dominated on Sunday. 

Charles Ollivon crossed, with Damian Pernaud getting a brace and Baptiste Couilloud, Max Spring and Antoine Hastoy going over, while a penalty try was also awarded as Eddie Jones' team were easily dispatched. 

Joe Cokanasiga, Jonny May and Marcus Smith scored for England but the latter missed all three conversions to cap off a sorry day.

With several experienced players in the squad, the showing will concern Jones ahead of England's tour of Australia, with the scoreline representing his biggest defeat as the team's coach.

However, he made it clear that the team utilised at Twickenham was not a true reflection of the squad he will select to take Down Under.

"It was a different sort of game, it's not England, it's an England select team," Jones told BBC Sport.

"We're disappointed we couldn't do more with our set-piece. We tried to get onto front foot but we didn't execute.

"This is not the England side. This was a warm-up game. We don't like to concede 50 points. We don't want that score.

"We tried to play differently, purposefully from our own 22. Thy had more combinations than we did."

In an interview with Amazon Prime, Jones added: "Obviously we are disappointed with the result.

"In terms of preparation for the tour, we tried a few different things and we weren't good enough but there are a few guys who played their first senior game and a few guys that played their first game for a few years.

"There is a big gap between club level and international rugby and some of the guys experienced that today and they will be better for it."

Greg Norman has accused the PGA Tour of "deafening hypocrisy" following the backlash to the LIV Golf Invitational Series.

Norman is the figurehead of the controversial, Saudi Arabia-backed breakaway competition, which started earlier in June with a tournament in London.

Critics have accused LIV Golf as being another method of sports washing from the Saudi regime.

Players that competed in the inaugural LIV Golf event have been suspended from the PGA Tour.

However, Norman has hit back and claimed the PGA Tour are showing hypocrisy, with the Australian citing sponsorship money that is raked in from Saudi Arabia.

"Look, if they want to look at it in prism, then why does the PGA Tour have 23 sponsors within the PGA Tour doing 40 plus billion dollars worth of business with Saudi Arabia?" he told Fox News.

"Why is it OK for the sponsors? Why is it OK that there's a Saudi sponsor, Aramco, the largest sponsor of women's golf in the world? Why is it OK for them? Why is it not OK for these players?

"Will [PGA Tour commissioner] Jay Monahan go to each and every one of those CEOs of the 23 companies that are investing into Saudi Arabia and suspend them and ban them? The hypocrisy in all this, it's so loud. It's deafening."

Norman added: "The European Tour since 2009, had a golf tournament, the Saudi International that's in existence since 2019.

"And during that Saudi International, there were PGA Tour players who were given rights and waivers to go play there. 

"So to me, if golf is good for the world, golf is good for Saudi, and you're seeing that growth internally, it's extremely impressive."

Beatriz Haddad Maia claimed back-to-back WTA Tour titles after Zhang Shuai retired hurt in the Birmingham Classic final on Sunday.

Haddad Maia enjoyed a fine day, beating second seed and two-time major champion Simona Halep 6-3 2-6 6-4 in a rearranged semi-final (postponed from Saturday due to rain).

Zhang followed that up by battling past Halep's Romanian compatriot Sorana Cirstea 4-6 6-1 7-6 (7-5), setting up a second career match with Haddad Maia.

The Brazilian struggled in the opening stages, with Zhang racing into the lead before squandering an opportunity to go 3-0 up.

Haddad Maia soon recovered to level at 3-3 before Zhang was forced to retire with an apparent neck injury, with the Chinese player 5-4 down in the first set.

 

That handed the world number 32 her second straight title after success at the Nottingham Open last week, with Ons Jabeur and Iga Swiatek the only others to record multiple WTA Tour triumphs this year.

Haddad Maia also became the first Brazilian lift the trophy in the tournament's 40-year history, surpassing the previous best result by a player from Brazil when Gisele Miro made the second round in 1989.

Fabio Quartararo declared he is "riding better than ever" after a tyre choice gamble paid off at the German Grand Prix on Sunday.

Track temperatures exceeded 50 degrees at the Sachsenring, where Francesco Bagnaia started on pole, with reigning MotoGP world champion Quartararo one of just two riders to opt for the medium rear tyre.

The Frenchman's decision was rewarded as he overtook Bagnaia on Turn 1, with Quartararo leading for all 30 laps and winning the race by almost five seconds to extend his lead in the championship to 34 points.

Bagnaia crashed out on lap four, losing the rear end of his GP22 for his fourth abandonment of the season, and last year's runner-up now sits 91 points behind Quartararo.

While Bagnaia was left to rue his mistake, Quartararo admitted he was nervous about his tyre decision.

"I feel tired. I was sick all weekend and during the race I was coughing a bit," Quartararo told reporters.

"I have no words. We took a choice on the rear tyre, the medium, that was really risky and in the race we were lucky because it dropped much more than expected.

"But I'm super happy. A really, really special victory, it was a little bit like Barcelona.

"On Friday I was not so great, yesterday was much better and this morning, with the medium tyre I felt it was the correct choice.

"In the race the conditions were totally different and from the beginning I was scared because I was using the tyre a little bit more than expected to ride fast.

"The last five, six laps were a total disaster from the rear. But the feeling on the front was super good."

Yamaha's Quartararo picked up his third win of 2022, adding to victories at the Portuguese Grand Prix and Catalan Grand Prix, and the 23-year-old feels he is in the form of his life.

"Of course, I'm feeling better than ever every time I race," the defending world champion added.

"I'm learning and I feel like every time I find something. The focus here was to make 30 laps in front and being consistent was something difficult.

"Barcelona helped me a lot because I had a similar situation, but of course I'm feeling confident and I feel I'm riding better than ever."

Ons Jabeur won the Berlin Open to seal her third career title following Belinda Bencic's retirement in the second set.

The win sees Jabeur rise to a career-high of number three in the world as the Tunisian – who was winning  6-3 2-1 when Bencic succumbed to an ankle injury – capitalised on her top seed position for the tournament.

With Jabeur on serve to clinch the first set, Bencic rolled her ankle and required treatment in a three-minute medical timeout – with Jabeur swiftly nosing herself ahead on the restart with an ace.

Olympic gold medallist Bencic pushed to continue but came to the net to retire when trailing 2-1 in the second set, taking Jabeur's tally of wins in 2022 to 30, a total that is only bettered by world number one Iga Swiatek.

Victory marked Jabeur's second title of 2022, with the 27-year-old having previously won the Madrid Open.

Jabeur had plenty of support from the crowd throughout the tournament, and said: "I cannot forget how amazing the crowd is, Tunisians are amazing, thank you for coming. I hope I can come back next year, it's been great to come back to Berlin."

Bencic paid tribute to her opponent following the game, saying: "You deserve this title, I really don't want to take this moment away from you because I think you played incredible tennis.

"This is the best tennis of your life, so I hope you continue. You gave me a really hard time, maybe it was one serve too much for me. This is your moment so I want you to enjoy it and focus on your title."

Jabeur continues her Wimbledon preparations at Eastbourne next week, competing in both the singles and doubles event – she will play alongside Serena Williams – while Bencic will be hoping to recover in time to feature in the season's third grand slam.

Daniil Medvedev lost a second final in two weeks as he fell to a straight-sets defeat to Hubert Hurkacz at the Halle Open on Sunday.

The world number one struggled to get going and repeatedly took his anger out on coach Gilles Cervara, who stormed out of his seat early in the second set.

Top seed Medvedev had already lost the first set 6-1 by that point and only fared slightly better in the second, which ended 6-4 in Hurkacz's favour.

Hurkacz has now won five ATP Tour titles, with this his first on grass, while Medvedev remains stuck on 13 having lost all three finals he has competed in this season.

The most recent of those losses came at the hands of world number 106 Tim van Rijthoven last week, but Medvedev had not dropped a set en route to Sunday's clash in Halle.

Indeed, Medvedev was 14-2 on grass since a first-round exit at Halle last year, yet Hurkacz broke the Russian's first two service games and eased into a 5-0 lead.

Having successfully served out the opener, Hurkacz – who beat the same opponent in this year's Miami Masters – again broke Medvedev in the first game of the second set.

Medvedev took aim at his coach at that point, with Cervara then spotted leaving the stands and failing to return for the remaining nine games, which went the way of the serve.

After easily navigating his way past Medvedev in a match lasting just over an hour, fifth seed Hurkacz becomes the seventh male player in the Open Era to win his first five career finals.

Matteo Berrettini ramped up his Wimbledon preparations by securing his seventh ATP Tour title and fourth on grass as he won again at the Queen's Club Championships.

The Italian returned from injury in emphatic fashion at the Stuttgart Open, defeating Andy Murray in the final, before heading to Queen's ahead of the start of the third major of the year.

Berrettini had little trouble negotiating his way through to Sunday's showpiece, dropping just one set throughout the tournament to set up a meeting with Filip Krajinovic.

And despite having to battle in the first set, Berrettini triumphed 7-5 6-4 to retain the title he won last year.

The 26-year-old had an early break cancelled out by Krajinovic but got a crucial second break to take the first set.

A tentative opening followed in the second set, yet Berrettini's patience paid off when he broke in the fifth game and he was able to serve out the victory.

That signified Berrettini's ninth straight win, all on grass, after a three-month injury lay-off.

Berrettini is the first player in the Open Era to win titles in each of his first two appearances at Queen's, and is the eighth repeat champion at the tournament – the other seven players to have achieved that feat are all former world number ones.

"I arrived to Stuttgart, and I wasn't feeling great, I wasn't hitting the ball the way I want it that way I used to do, and I was like 'guys I think it's going be tough' and then it went pretty well," he said after the win," Berrettini said.

"I mean I guess I'm Italian, I'm always complaining!"

Berrettini has also advanced to the final in all four of his past grass-court events, with his only defeat coming against Novak Djokovic at Wimbledon last year.

The world number 10 will now look to go one better this time around at The All England Club.

Zizou Bergs earned a wildcard for Wimbledon and a grand slam main draw debut by beating Jack Sock in the Ilkley Trophy final on Sunday.

Named after Zinedine Zidane – the France, Juventus and Real Madrid football great who goes by the nickname 'Zizou' – Belgian Bergs has established his sporting career in tennis.

Bergs, 23, is ranked a lowly 207th by the ATP and had to come through qualifying to play in the Ilkley event, a Challenger Tour tournament in Yorkshire.

Former world number eight Sock stood in his way in the final, but Bergs secured a 7-6 (9-7) 2-6 7-6 (8-6) victory over the American.

His father Koen Bergs wrote on Twitter: "Yesssssss. The tournament director announced during the ceremony the official reward of the WC for @Wimbledon main draw. History is made."

His triumphant son added on Instagram: "WIMBLEDON MAIN DRAW WILDCARD!! Whuuuutttt"

Bergs completes the list of men's singles wildcards, featuring alongside five British players plus Dutchman Tim van Rijthoven and Swiss three-time grand slam winner Stan Wawrinka.

Wimbledon begins on June 27 at the All England Club in south-west London.

Peter Sagan has seen his Tour de France preparations take a hit after testing positive for COVID-19 less than two weeks before the start of the race.

Seven-time Tour de France green jersey winner Sagan was forced to abandon the Tour de Suisse on Saturday due to a third positive coronavirus test in 18 months.

The Slovakian, who holds the record for the most points classification victories in the Tour de France (seven), took to Twitter to announce he had contracted the virus on Sunday.

"Yesterday, Saturday, after the finish of stage seven of the Tour de Suisse, I was given a COVID-19 test by the Team TotalEnergies doctor," he wrote.

"Unfortunately, it came out positive. I have no symptoms, and I feel well but I have to abandon the race. I thank you for your support and I will keep you posted."

Sagan becomes the latest name in a growing list of riders to contract the virus, with INEOS Grenadiers' Tom Pidcock and Bora-Hansgrohe's Aleksandr Vlasov also testing positive for COVID-19.

Vlasov was leading the Tour de Suisse at the time of his withdrawal, while Mikkel Bjerg – team-mate of two-time Tour de France winner Tadej Pogacar – withdrew from the Tour of Slovenia due to coronavirus.

Sagan will hope to recover in time for the start of the Tour de France in Copenhagen on July 1, having ended a 13-month winless drought with his sprint victory at stage three in Grenchen earlier this week.

Fabio Quartararo extended his MotoGP championship lead with victory at the German Grand Prix, where Francesco Bagnaia suffered yet more disappointment by crashing out.

Bagnaia had won twice in his past four races and set a scorching pace to claim pole at Sachsenring, but he was overtaken by Quartararo on Turn 1 and lasted three more laps.

In an attempt to reclaim first place from reigning world champion Quartararo, Bagnaia lost the rear end of his GP22 when coming through Turn 1 on lap four and left the track.

Bagnaia was unhurt physically, but his furious reaction said it all, with last year's runner-up now 91 points behind Quartararo and surely out of title contention for another year.

It was the fourth abandonment of the season for the Ducati rider, which is two more failures than he suffered throughout last year's 18-race campaign.

Adding to his victory at the Catalan Grand Prix last time out, Quartararo had no trouble in retaining his lead in Germany to move 34 points in front of Aleix Espargaro in the championship.

Monster Energy Yamaha's Quartararo is the first MotoGP rider other than Marc Marquez to win on this track since 2012, with the Spaniard missing this race due to injury.

Pramac Racing's Johann Zarco stayed safe in second place, 5.3 seconds behind the race winner, while Jack Miller did brilliantly to pip Espargaro to a place on the podium.

Luca Marini and Zarco's team-mate Jorge Martin completed the top six, with the latter returning to action after a period out following hand surgery.

Elsewhere, Maverick Vinales was forced to retire with 13 laps to go due to his rear ride-height device jamming. Joan Mir and Pol Espargaro were also among those not to finish.


TOP 10

1. Fabio Quartararo (Monster Energy Yamaha)
2. Johann Zarco (Pramac Racing) +4.939s
3. Jack Miller (Ducati) +8.372s
4. Aleix Espargaro (Aprilia) +9.113s
5. Luca Marini (Mooney VR46) +11.679s
6. Jorge Martin (Pramac Racing) +13.164s
7. Brad Binder (Red Bull KTM) +15.405s
8. Fabio Di Giannantonio (Gresini) +15.851s
9. Miguel Oliveira (Red Bull KTM) +19.740s
10. Enea Bastianini (Gresini) +21.611s

CHAMPIONSHIP STANDINGS

Riders
1. Fabio Quartararo (Monster Energy Yamaha) 172
2. Aleix Espargaro (Aprilia) 138
3. Johann Zarco (Pramac Racing) 111
4. Enea Bastianini (Gresini) 100
5. Brad Binder (Red Bull KTM) 82

Teams
1. Monster Energy Yamaha 197
2. Aprilia Racing 184
3. Pramac Racing 172
4. Ducati 162
5. Red Bull KTM 146

Matt Fitzpatrick heads into the final round of the U.S. Open with a share of the lead and the confidence of a previous win in Brookline.

The 27-year-old, who recorded the best major result of his career last time out with a tie for fifth at the US PGA Championship, shot a 68 on Saturday to join Will Zalatoris on four under for the tournament.

Saturday's third round was a tricky one for most of the rest of the field, with only nine players now under par.

But Fitzpatrick knows exactly how to succeed at this course, having won the U.S. Amateur in Massachusetts in 2013.

He could now follow in the footsteps of the great Jack Nicklaus, who repeated his U.S. Amateur triumph at Pebble Beach in 1961 by winning the U.S. Open at the same course 11 years later.

"I certainly think it gives me an edge over the others," Fitzpatrick said, looking forward to Sunday's action. "I genuinely do believe that.

"It's a real, obviously positive moment in my career. It kind of kick-started me.

"To come back here and play so well again, it just gives me growing confidence round by round."

But Fitzpatrick knows he will not have it easy, with his experience of a tough final day at the US PGA – which he entered in second place – fresh in his mind.

"I think up until Southern Hills, I didn't really appreciate how hard it is actually to win a major," he said. "I've not challenged really up until then.

"I think, myself included, people on the outside maybe think it's easier than it is.

"You just have to look at Tiger [Woods]. He knocked off so many in such a quick span. That's why I think people think, 'oh, it's a piece of cake; it's like a regular Tour event'. But it's not.

"It brings a lot more to the mental aspect of the game than other regular events, and for me, I think it's been a big change from US PGA to come here to a golf course I know so well, and it's given me extra confidence."

Fitzpatrick might not get a better chance to land his first major win, and he accepts: "Would my career be incomplete if I didn't have one? Sure, yeah.

"I would be disappointed if I didn't, yeah. I genuinely would be disappointed if I didn't.

"I feel like certainly now these last two majors, I feel so much more comfortable out here. My game has changed for the better. I've given myself more chances.

"I definitely feel like I have much more of a chance now to win a major than I ever have done in my career, obviously."

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