F1 extends Chinese Grand Prix contract through 2025

By Sports Desk November 05, 2021

Formula One has re-affirmed its commitment to China, announcing Saturday that its deal with the Chinese Grand Prix has been extended through 2025. 

The Shanghai race has not been contested since 2019 due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The stop was omitted from the 23-race F1 calendar for the 2022 season that was announced last month, with the series saying it would return as soon as possible. 

F1 president and CEO Stefano Domenicali echoed those sentiments in Saturday's announcement of an extended deal. 

"While we are all disappointed we could not include China on the 2022 calendar due to ongoing pandemic conditions, China will be restored to the calendar as soon as conditions allow and we look forward to being back with the fans as soon as we can," Domenicali said in a release. 

Lewis Hamilton won the last race there and has been victorious in six of the 16 editions of the event, four more than any other driver. 

 

 

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