Alia Atkinson notches more wins at Southern Zone Sectionals

By Sports Desk February 14, 2021

Jamaican Olympian Alia Atkinson continued her winning ways at the multi-site Southern Zone Sectionals that got underway in Coral Springs and Sarasota respectively late last week.

In the 50m butterfly at Coral Springs, Atkinson was in a league of her own as she stopped the clock in 26.61. Second overall went to Olivia Peoples of the Bolles Sharks in Sarasota and Kathryn Giuffdra of Haines City Tritons in Coral Springs who both clocked 27.73.

The time was the Atkinson was under 27 seconds since 2018. It is also her third fastest ever performance and puts her national record of 26.54 in jeopardy.

In the 50m breaststroke Atkinson easily won gold in a time of 31.45.

Second place went to Marcela Scaramuzza of Trinity Prep in 33.10 and Taylor Grabenhorst won bronze in 33.15.

In winning, Atkinson easily demolished her 2021 season-best of 33.47 set last Saturday at Plantation. With her win on Thursday, the national record holder extends her unbeaten streak in the event in America to eight races.

Since 2017, she has turned back all challengers on US soil. She is the only CARIFTA region swimmer to make the World Championship final in the event. She also holds the accolade of being the only medalist in this sprint race.

Meanwhile, national teammate Morgan Cogle, who represents the Jupiter Dragons, lowered her personal best of 33.33 from 2018 in the 50m backstroke crushing it to record 32.67 and place 18th overall.

World Championship representative Keanan Dols who swims for the Gator Swim Club was 21st in the 50-metre butterfly stopping the clock in a time of 26.63.

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    Team USA's haul of 113 medals at the Tokyo Games – comprising 39 gold, 41 silver and 33 bronze – was 25 more than second-placed China, while Japan finished third.

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