EPL

Klopp clarifies stance on Germany job

By Sports Desk March 17, 2021

Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp has clarified his stance on the Germany job.

Klopp ruled himself out of contention for the international role last week after incumbent Joachim Low announced he would depart after Euro 2020.

That remains the case, with Klopp committed to Liverpool.

But after seeing some of the reaction to his comments, the 53-year-old stressed he was not ruling himself out forever and that it was simply a question of timing.

"The important thing is: I didn't say that I didn't want to become a national coach, but that I couldn't – that is a huge difference," Klopp said to Sport Bild. 

"It would without question be a great honour [to take on the legacy left by Low].

"But this is my sixth year in Liverpool and there is a very clear commitment. 

"I have an important role here and I've built incredible relationships with people I work with on a daily basis. 

"We rely on each other. Can I say 'I'll be gone by then' [a specific time]? That won't work.

"The timing is not right. I am very sorry if I've let people down with it, but I can't just step out of my responsibilities."

Asked about who should replace Low – who took the job in 2006 – Klopp felt Bayern Munich head coach Hansi Flick "would fill the role excellently" if interested.

But Ralf Rangnick stands out as his favourite candidate.

"I think Ralf Rangnick is an extraordinary coach, especially for an association [the DFB] in which they have been trying to change things for years," said Klopp.

"Ralf could push a lot of things. I think he is a very good choice. 

"He is a great coach, who was always ready to think outside the box and to tweak structures."

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