Australia skipper Finch heading home to boost fitness ahead of T20 World Cup

By Sports Desk July 25, 2021

Aaron Finch is heading home from Australia's tour of the Caribbean in a bid to be fit for the T20 World Cup later this year.

Australia captain Finch sustained a knee injury during the final game of the T20 series with the West Indies in Saint Lucia – the tourists suffering a 4-1 defeat.

The 34-year-old, who suffered a cartilage problem earlier in the series, has subsequently missed the opening two one-day internationals between the nations at the Kensington Oval.

After the final ODI on Monday, Justin Langer's side travel to Bangladesh for another five-game T20 series as they step up preparations for the World Cup in October.

Finch, who scored a T20I record of 172 runs against Zimbabwe in July 2018, is likely to undergo surgery on his right knee upon returning to Melbourne.

And although frustrated to be departing the tour, the skipper is confident it will increase his chances of leading Australia out in three months' time. 

“I’m extremely disappointed to be heading home,” he said.

“This was considered the best course of action rather than heading to Bangladesh, not being able to play and losing that recovery time.

“I will have surgery if required and start the recovery process ahead of the World Cup."

Taking place in Oman and the United Arab Emirates, the T20 World Cup will run from October 17 to November 14.

Australia have been drawn alongside the Windies in Group 1 of the Super 12 stage, as well as England and South Africa.

Runners-up to England in 2010, Australia will be seeking a first triumph in the event, which they are also set to host next year.

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