Skerritt, Shallow launch bid for a second term of CWI leadership promising to build on first-term accomplishments

By Sports Desk March 08, 2021

Cricket West Indies President Ricky Skerritt and Dr Kishore Shallow have officially launched their bid to lead for a second term with promises to build on their first term of their leadership of regional cricket.

Under a campaign slogan Forward ‘WI’ Go, the incumbents have promised to continue to lead the fight for organizational modernization, including greater transparency, accountability, and partnership with all stakeholders, designed to support and prepare for achieving the best possible on-field results.

Skerritt said he and Dr Shallow would also continue to battle against petty boardroom politics and territorial insularity, two of the biggest enemies of West Indies cricket progress.

The duo is being challenged by the ticket of Guyana Cricket Board Secretary Anand Sanasie and Barbados Cricket Board Vice President Calvin Hope.  

The incumbents both candidates received nominations from the same two territorial boards that first advocated for their candidacies in 2019, the Leeward Islands Cricket Board (LICB) and Trinidad & Tobago Cricket Board (TTCB).

They also said they have received formal advice of support from the Windward Islands Cricket Board (WICB) and predicts similar support from the Jamaica Cricket Association (JCA) for the elections set to take place on Sunday, March 28, 2021.

“Some people seem to believe that the CWI boardroom is a type of Parliament where their only job is to oppose or resist any decision that doesn’t directly benefit them individually. Sadly, both of our election opponents are strong proponents of that same antiquated, self-centred, and confrontational mindset”, Skerritt said in a statement today.

“This CWI 2021 leadership election provides another opportunity for cricket lovers to think seriously about who is best suited to champion the bigger cause of West Indies Cricket, at this crucial time. Two years ago, the Skerritt-Shallow partnership introduced our Ten (10) Point ‘Cricket First’ Plan, which has become the improvement mantra of our stewardship.

“As we now approach the completion of a very challenging but productive first term, we are upgrading that plan. We are proud of the numerous transformational changes which are already taking place at CWI based on that very plan, some of the points are now self-sustaining in their implementation, but some points still need our direct attention. We are therefore pleased to let the Caribbean public know that we will be seeking re-election to a second term of the CWI offices of President and Vice President based on an updated Ten-Point plan.”

Half-way through the first term of Skerritt-Shallow, in March 2020, the region was confronted by the unexpected challenges of the COVID-19 Pandemic.

 CWI, Skerritt said, responded quickly and strategically and has been exemplary in how it pivoted to the forefront of the international risk management response. CWI under Skerritt-Shallow were already implementing the 28 recommendations of the CWI 2019 PKF Business Situation Assessment and Financial Review when the pandemic hit. "However, amid these debilitating challenges and unpredictable outlook, our 10 Point ‘Cricket First’ Plan has continued to be the foundation of the Skerritt-Shallow stewardship," the president said.

They say they have identified 10 priorities that will now constitute their upgraded ‘Cricket First Plus’ plan for their second term in office:

 

  • Greater investment in Grassroots Cricket, in partnership with Governments

 

  • Expansion of the Coaching Education program to reach over 1000 Foundation Level volunteer coaches across the region, to include teachers and parents

 

  • Review of the Regional Professional Franchise System, to improve standards and to generate a more sustainable cricket and learning culture.

 

  • Increased Fan engagement, with commercial benefits

 

  • Greater international exposure for U23, Emerging and A-team players

 

  • Implementation of a Master Plan for CCG as the hub of a Regional High-Performance System, that includes a network of Academies across the region.

 

  • Optimum use of Science and Technology geared towards significant gains in productivity on all operational fronts.

 

  • Development of a Financial Sustainability Plan, to include increased support for Territorial Boards, on an incentivised basis.

 

  • Establishment of a Past-Players Consultative Forum

 

  • Strategic collaboration with the owners of CPL to achieve mutually desired cricket and commercial outcomes.

 

The Skerritt-Shallow leadership said they have set the stage for CWI to strengthen partnerships further with all stakeholders, especially the Territorial Boards, to build together and sustain a modern cricket-centric organization, featuring a cricket system that will produce more knowledgeable, confident and battle-ready cricketers. Skerritt-Shallow continues to be the leadership team that is best suited to continue the important work that we have started together, on behalf of the needs of West Indies cricket.

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