CPL

Hero CPL goes virtual with launch of new Esports gaming series

By Sports Desk March 26, 2021

The Hero Caribbean Premier League will be launching an exciting new content series, the Hero CPL Esports League, featuring professional cricketers from around the world playing Cricket 19, the leading cricket console game.

This is the first time a T20 franchise tournament has had an Esports competition with the cricketers representing their franchise as the Hero CPL continues to push the boundaries of engagement with their fans.

Released next week, this fun and engaging series will bring the reality of T20 cricket, but with a big difference – the players will be controlling virtual versions of themselves and instead of just having their own game to worry about they are in charge of all of their teammates.

 “The Hero CPL is always looking to engage fans in different ways and this is another example of us innovating. This series is another first for a tournament that prides itself on being at the cutting edge of entertainment and we are very excited about seeing the reaction from our fans as they see these CPL stars show off their competitive skills in a virtual tournament,” said Hero CPL COO Pete Russell.

The players taking part are Colin Munro playing as the Trinbago Knight Riders, Mitchell Santner representing Barbados Tridents, Andre Fletcher and Kesrick Williams playing as St Lucia Zouks, Sheldon Cottrell and Ish Sodhi representing St Kitts & Nevis Patriots, Nicholas Pooran and Ashmead Nedd representing the Guyana Amazon Warriors and Glenn Phillips and Ryan Persaud representing Jamaica Tallawahs. At the end of the competition, an individual champion is crowned as the first winner of the virtual Hero CPL.

 “It is really exciting to be involved in this new competition and it didn't take long for my competitive instincts to kick in. One of the great things about the CPL is that they are always trying something new and it was great to be involved in the first franchise Esports League," Munro said.

This series will give Hero CPL fans and gamers alike the opportunity to get behind their favourite players and teams once again as they take on their rivals in this groundbreaking gaming format. They will be able to see and hear the passion these players have when they are competing, with a controller in their hands rather than a bat and ball.

The shows are hosted by Gautam Bhimani and Alex Jordan who bring you all the action during this hard-fought tournament.

This content series is being supported by Hero MotoCorp Limited (HMCL), the world’s largest two-wheeler manufacturer, who have been the title sponsors of the Hero Caribbean Premier League since 2015. Hero has long been a key partner of marquee sporting events - including cricket, soccer, field hockey and golf - in India and across the globe and this partnership sees them also venturing into the ever-growing Esports arena.

Episode one will go live on 2 April 2021 (1 pm GMT, 6:30 pm IST, 9 am ECT) on Hero CPL’s YouTube and Facebook channels and the series will also be shown with selected broadcasters.

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    After an illustrious career that spanned more than two decades, St Lucian high jumper Levern Spencer has called time on her athletic career.

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    However, after failing to make the finals of the high jump at the Tokyo Olympics in August, the 37-year-old St Lucian star, has decided it was time to hang up her spikes.

    “After 23 consecutive years of representing St. Lucia in the sport of track and field, I have, after careful consideration and analysis, made the tough decision to retire, effective 31st October 2021,” she said in a statement released on Wednesday.

    “It was a challenging journey laced with lots of literal blood, sweat, and tears, but a very rewarding journey as well, which led me to four consecutive Olympics, eight consecutive World Championships, five consecutive Commonwealth Games, and gave me 16 Sportswoman of The Year titles.

    “So as I hang up my spikes as Commonwealth Champion, Central America & The Caribbean Champion, Pan American Champion and North & Central America and the Caribbean Champion, I say a big thank you to the Government and People of St. Lucia for the privilege of flying our flag regionally and internationally for all these years, and for your support on this journey.”

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    First off was St Kitts’ highly laudable hosting of the entire tournament’s thirty-three matches at a single venue, the Warner Park stadium. Kudos of the very highest order are now deservedly due to the Curator and his ground staff, the Tournament Director and indeed everyone who was in any way involved in the hosting of such a very well organized and executed tournament as this year’s CPL was. Hats off also to all concerned for having managed the required Bio Bubble without incident and as well for getting the players and their attending family members in and out of St Kitts safely.

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    The 22-year-old Jevan Royal’s 12 wickets with his left-arm spin was yet another encouraging CPL 2021 performance. Among the batters, the 23-year-old Sherfayne Rutherford’s aggregate of 262 runs, including three half-centuries, from 10 innings batted was also impressive.

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    Indeed, plenty for the CPL to ponder as it looks back on its concluded 2021 Season and forwards to 2022!

    About The Writers:
    Guyana-born, Toronto-based, Tony McWatt now serves as Cricket Canada’s Media Relations Manager. He is the Publisher of both the WI Wickets and Wickets monthly online cricket magazines that are respectively targeted towards the Caribbean and Canadian readers. He is also the only son of former Guyana and West Indies wicket-keeper batsman the late Clifford “Baby Boy” McWatt.

    Guyana-born Reds (Perreira) has served as a world-recognized West Indies Cricket Commentator for well over fifty years. Reds made his broadcasting debut during the 1971 West Indies-India Test Series, and has commentated on hundreds of matches since then!

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