Tokyo Olympics: Germany modern pentathlon coach thrown out of Games for hitting horse

By Sports Desk August 07, 2021

Germany's modern pentathlon coach Kim Raisner has been disqualified from the Olympic Games after hitting a horse that refused to jump during the women's competition.

Early leader Annika Schleu's medal hopes were shattered on Friday when Saint Boy, the horse she was allocated for the show-jumping section of the five-discipline event, proved unwilling to perform.

It led to Schleu being reduced to tears while still on board the seemingly agitated horse as her prospects of success slipped away.

Raisner suggested Schleu hit the horse to jolt it into action, before striking it herself near its rear left leg.

Modern pentathlon's world governing body, the UIPM said on Saturday its executive board (EB) had "given a black card to the Germany team coach Kim Raisner, disqualifying her from the remainder of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games".

"The EB reviewed video footage that showed Ms Raisner appearing to strike the horse Saint Boy, ridden by Annika Schleu, with her fist during the riding discipline of the women's modern pentathlon competition," the UIPM added in a statement.

"Her actions were deemed to be in violation of the UIPM competition rules, which are applied to all recognised modern pentathlon competitions including the Olympic Games.

"The EB decision was made today at the Tokyo Stadium before the resumption of the men's modern pentathlon competition."

That meant Raisner was not present as Germany competed on Saturday, with Patrick Dogue finishing second in the show-jumping stage in her absence.

Germany's modern pentathlon federation, the DVMF, promised an investigation.

Modern pentathlon competitors are presented with horses for the show-jumping element, and have 20 minutes to become acquainted before they must ride.

"It goes without saying that there will be a comprehensive and critical evaluation of what happened after the Olympic Games," the DVMF said.

"The DVMF also makes it clear that the welfare of the horses is the unreserved concern of the association."

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